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AMST 1104 : Race and Ethnicity in the United States: Social Constructs, Real World Consequences
Crosslisted as: LSP 1105, SOC 1104 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will examine race and ethnic relations between Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Asians in the United States. The goal of this course is for students to understand how the history of race and ethnicity in the U.S. affects opportunity structures in, for example, education, employment, housing, and health. Through this course students will gain a better understanding of how race and ethnicity stratifies the lives of individuals in the U.S.
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AMST 1115 : Introduction to American Government and Politics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 1111 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A policy-centered approach to the study of government in the American experience.  Considers the American Founding and how it influenced the structure of government;  how national institutions operate in shaping law and public policy; who has a voice in American politics and why some are more influential than others; and how existing public policies themselves influence social, economic, and political power.  Students will gain an introductory knowledge of the founding principles and structure of American government, political institutions, political processes, political behavior, and public policy.
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AMST 1140 : FWS: Common Ground: Education Beyond The Ivory Tower
Crosslisted as: EDUC 1140, WRIT 1400 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers you a chance to become a more engaged member of the Ithaca community as part of your first-year writing experience. For two afternoons a week, Cornell students will engage with Ithaca middle school students as mentors and tutors outside of class. Writing assignments will help you reflect on the tutoring experience and the role of education and responsible citizenship in a democratic society.
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AMST 1147 : FWS: The Legal Life of American Racism
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We know that racism isn't just about feelings, but rather it is institutional. What about the legal life of racism? That is, what if racism wasn't just a result of how the legal system (courts, police, prisons, etc.) applies laws, but what if racism had a life within U.S. law itself? In this course we will explore the ways in which American law worked in concert with custom to attempt to encode definitions of race into U.S. society. Topics will include slavery, Jim Crow, immigration (both contemporary and historical), Japanese internment, and Indian Law, among others. Students will practice writing skills while exploring the possibilities practicing a radical form of revision to intervene in the legal life of racism.
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AMST 1160 : Learning Where You Live: Americans Encountering Race, Culture, and Community through Food
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores both the joyful and the dark sides of eating and traces how "taste" informs the various ways in which we ingest the world, specifically "racial and cultural otherness." We will explore the various connections, both abstractly and materially, between food, race, culture and politics. We will consider how the meeting of food, word, and image (in novels, poems, and television) inform large social categories. This course approaches food through a comparative racial-ethnic framework, including works from Asian American, African American, and Latino cultural producers. Students will engage in group discussions, considering food and putting it in conversation with literature, art, current events, imperialism, and history. Students will also have the opportunity to engage in tastings, hands-on food preparation, and community dinner.
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AMST 1290 : American Society through Film
Crosslisted as: SOC 1290 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Introduces students to the sociological analysis of American society through the lens of film. Major themes involve race, class, and gender; upward and downward mobility; incorporation and exclusion; small town vs the big city; and cultural conflicts over individualism, achievement, and community. We match a range of movies like American Graffiti (Lucas), Ace in the Hole (Wilder), The Asphalt Jungle (Houston), Do the Right Thing (Lee), The Heiress (Wyler), High Noon (Zinnemann), Mean Streets (Scorsese), Nashville (Altman), The Philadelphia Story (Cukor), and A Streetcar Named Desire (Kazan). Each film is paired with social scientific research that examines parallel topics, such as analyses of who goes to college, the production of news, deviant careers, urban riots, the gendered presentation of self, and the prisoner's dilemma.
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AMST 1313 : A Survey of Jazz
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 1313 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course addresses jazz from two perspectives: the various sounds of jazz, as well as the historical streams-musical and cultural-that have contributed to its development. Listening and writing assignments are major components of the course.
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AMST 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1500, GOVT 1503 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
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AMST 1585 : Sports and Politics in American History
Crosslisted as: HIST 1585 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the relationship between sports and politics over the course of American history since the 19th century.  Sports and politics have come together surprisingly frequently in the last two centuries and this course will take a "case study" method to examine particular episodes of politicized sports.  In the course of our investigations, we will the following questions: How do we define politics?  How have sports acted as a place for subversion and resistance? Conversely, how have sports reflected the power structure? No background knowledge is necessary.   Course materials will include memoirs, articles, and a variety of visual sources, including film and photography.   Course requirements will include a research paper.
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AMST 1595 : African American History From 1865
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1595, HIST 1595 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Focusing on political and social history, this course surveys African-American history from Emancipation to the present. The class examines the post-Reconstruction "Nadir" of black life; the mass black insurgency against structural racism before and after World War II; and the Post-Reform Age that arose in the wake of the dismantling of legal segregation. The course will familiarize students with the basic themes of African-American life and experience and equip them to grasp concepts of political economy; class formation; and the intersection of race, class and gender.
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AMST 1600 : Indigenous North America
Crosslisted as: AIIS 1100, ANTHR 1700 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the diverse cultures, histories and contemporary situations of the Indigenous peoples of North America. Students will also be introduced to important themes in the post-1492 engagement between Indigenous and settler populations in North America and will consider the various and complex ways in which that history affected - and continues to affect - American Indian peoples and societies. Course materials draw on the humanities, social sciences, and expressive arts.
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AMST 1601 : Indigenous Issues in Global Perspectives
Crosslisted as: AIIS 1110 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course attends to the contemporary issues, contexts and experiences of Indigenous peoples. Students will develop a substantive understanding of colonialism and engage in the parallels and differences of its histories, forms, and effects on Indigenous peoples globally.  Contemporary Indigenous theorists, novelists, visual artists and historians have a prominent place in the course, highlighting social/environmental philosophies, critical responses to and forms of resistance toward neocolonial political and economic agendas and the fundamental concern for Indigenous self determination, among other topics.
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AMST 1802 : Introduction to Latinos in U.S. History
Crosslisted as: HIST 1802, LATA 1802, LSP 1802 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How would our understanding of U.S. History change if we began the national narrative in 16th century New Mexico rather than 17th century Virginia? What does U.S. history look like when examined as part of a broader hemispheric history? What does U.S. history look like from the vantage point of the immigrant, the refugee and asylum seeker, the exile, transmigrante, and transnational?
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AMST 1885 : Consumer Culture
Crosslisted as: HIST 1885 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will examine consumerism in the United States, first focusing on the rise of advertising, mass market goods, shop windows, and department stores at the turn of the 20th century. We will examine the built environment and experience of shopping and the consequent disease of "kleptomania," or shoplifting, looking at inequality and activism as potential political outlet for consumerism. We will also ask study consumerism as a system. What stands outside consumer culture? Are the most precious, protected parts of our daily lives actually the most commercialized: nature, love, the gift, the family? What does it mean to commodify love or bottle nature? Can art or beauty be beyond value? This class moves beyond a discussion of Nikes and fast cars, asking for a wholesale revision of what can't be bought: Is it nature, family, love, art?
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AMST 1886 : Introduction to Food Studies: History and Culture
Crosslisted as: HIST 1886 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course introduces students to the growing field of academic Food Studies, providing historical perspective into the development of American culinary culture. 
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AMST 1951 : Foreign Policy as Subversion
Crosslisted as: HIST 1951, LATA 1951 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To what extent does the ideal of the US as a vanguard for democracy and freedom in the world match up with other aspects—military, economic, and humanitarian—of US foreign policy? This same question about the degree to which discourses and practices correspond might be asked of other countries, like the Soviet Union, China, and Britain, but this course examines the ways in which US foreign policy has been deployed over the course of the twentieth century and the ways those policies have been perceived and received by people living in Latin America and Southeast Asia. Particular case studies will be addressed stemming from the faculty's specializations (for example, Vietnam, Cambodia, Guatemala, and Chile) and the emphasis is on the role of the United States in Latin America and Southeast Asia. Prominent themes will include forms of subversion, from military muscle to economic coercion, and how and why they have changed over time; meanings of liberty, democracy, freedom, and sovereignty in different places and times; popular responses to policies and actions of foreign administrations; the relationships between sovereign states and transnational corporations; the uses and abuses of History in the formulation and justification of policy initiatives and in local responses to them; and the complexities involved in discerning internal and external forces in an increasingly transnational world.
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AMST 2000 : Introduction to Visual Studies
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2000, COML 2000, VISST 2000 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce you to the field of Visual Studies.  Visual Studies seeks to define and improve our visual relationship to nature and culture after the modern surge in technology and knowledge.  Our field contains objects, images, and problems that lie beyond the fine art boundaries of Art History and the methodological boundaries of experimental science, yet is grown using seeds from both academic cultures.  If you see yourself as a "visual person" and want to explore your interests within both science and art, then this is the course for you.  You will learn the physical and legal limits of human, animal, and machine vision, how knowledge and power gets into images, how spectacle drives the economy, and savvy techniques of analysis that will help you deliver fresh perspectives to whatever course of study you follow.
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AMST 2001 : The First American University
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2999, HIST 2005 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Educational historian Frederick Rudolph called Cornell University "the first American university," referring to its unique role as a coeducational, nonsectarian, land-grant institution with a broad curriculum and diverse student body. In this course, we will explore the history of Cornell, taking as our focus the pledge of Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White to found a university where "any person can find instruction in any study." The course will cover a wide range of topics and perspectives relating to the faculty, student body, evolution of campus, and important events and eras in Cornell history. Stories and vignettes will provide background on the current university and its administrative structure, campus traditions, and the names that adorn buildings and memorials throughout campus. Finally, the course will offer a forum for students to address questions on present-day aspects of the university.
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AMST 2006 : Punk Culture: The Aesthetics and Politics of Refusal
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 2006 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 2042 : Jim Crow and Exclusion Era in America
Crosslisted as: AAS 2042, HIST 2042 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar examines America during the overlapping eras of segregation & immigration exclusion.  Beginning with contests over the weaning of freedom during reconstruction and running through the institution of Jim Crow legislation and immigration exclusion, the course ends with an evaluation of mid-20th century movements for civil rights and equality.  Themes include the links between racial and economic oppression, legal and defacto restriction, everyday resistance, and struggles for equality.
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AMST 2060 : The Great American Cornell Novel
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2060 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Some of the best novels of the last 70 years were written by people who were students or professors at Cornell. Reading a selection of these great Cornell novels, we will also be tracing the history and development of post-WWII American fiction. Readings will include classic works by V. Nabokov, T. Pynchon, W. Gass, J. Russ and T. Morrison, as well as several more recent (some very recent) works by your fellow Cornellians. Perhaps in a few years your work will be on the list.
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AMST 2112 : Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2112, HIST 2112, RELST 2112 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines Black spirituality, religion, and protest from an historical perspective, beginning with African traditions and Christianity during enslavement, which created resistance ideology and racial nationalism. Prophetic Christianity and church formation became primary political weapons after enslavement, particularly in the Age of Jim Crow, and foundationally led to twentieth century civil rights movements. While exploring these themes, the course will also analyze the complexities and contractions (i.e. Southern Baptist Convention, Nation of Islam and Black Lives Matter) inherent in resistance movements based on spiritual leadership.
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AMST 2220 : From the New Deal to the Age of Reagan
Crosslisted as: HIST 2220 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will explore some of the major political and cultural trends in the United States,  from the era of the Democratic New Dealer, Franklin D. Roosevelt, through the era of the conservative Republican, Ronald Reagan? This seminar will explore through primary source research and secondary readings  the key economic, political, and cultural characteristics and transformations of the period from 1930 though the turn of the century.  The course will examine the rise, persistence, and breakdown of the so-called "New Deal Order" and the crucial political shifts that we call the "Reagan Revolution." A key theme in this course will be the transformations and critiques of American liberalism and conservatism.
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AMST 2225 : Controversies About Inequality
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2220, GOVT 2225, ILROB 2220, PAM 2220, PHIL 1950, SOC 2220 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In recent years, poverty and inequality have become increasingly common topics of public debate, as academics, journalists, and politicians attempt to come to terms with growing income inequality, with the increasing visibility of inter-country differences in wealth and income, and with the persistence of racial, ethnic, and gender stratification. This course introduces students to ongoing social scientific debates about the sources and consequences of inequality, as well as the types of public policy that might appropriately be pursued to reduce (or increase) inequality. These topics will be addressed in related units, some of which include guest lectures by faculty from other universities (funded by the Center for the Study of Inequality). Each unit culminates with a highly spirited class discussion and debate.
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AMST 2251 : U.S. Immigration Narratives
Crosslisted as: HIST 2251, LSP 2251 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Americans are conflicted about immigration.  We honor and celebrate (and commercialize) our immigrant heritage in museums, folklife festivals, parades, pageants, and historical monuments. We also build fences and detention centers, and pass more and more laws to bar access to the United States. Polls tell us that Americans are concerned about the capacity of the United States to absorb so many immigrants from around the world. How often have we heard the laments "Today's immigrants are too different. They don't want to assimilate" or "My grandparents learned English quickly, why can't they?" The assumption is that older generations 'Americanized' quickly but that today's immigrants do not want to assimilate. Did 19th century immigrants really migrate to the United States to "become Americans"? Did they really assimilate quickly? Are today's immigrants really all that different from the immigrants who arrived earlier? Why do these particular narratives have such power and currency? This seminar will explore these issues and help students discern fact from fiction. 
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AMST 2260 : Music of the 1960s
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2260, MUSIC 2260 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this class, we will examine how musicians working in such genres as rock, jazz, folk, classical, soul, and experimental music responded and contributed to the major themes of the 1960s in the US: the counterculture, Vietnam, the civil rights movement, women's liberation, and the space race. We will examine written texts, recordings, and films from the period. The ability to read music is not required.
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AMST 2274 : The Manson Murders
Crosslisted as: HIST 2274 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
On August 9-10, 1969, ex-convict, aspiring rock star, and charismatic leader Charles Manson ordered his so-called Family to brutally murder a few of LA's rich, white, "beautiful people" and leave clues implicating black radicals. The idea was to trigger an apocalyptic race war he called "Helter Skelter" (after a song by The Beatles). Today, these murders stand as the most infamous in twentieth-century U.S. criminal history and as synecdoche for the "end of the Sixties." They have also spawned a veritable Manson Industry in the popular realm: there are now Manson books, movies, TV shows, documentaries, podcasts, websites, music, comics, t-shirts, and even a tourist attraction (the Hollywood "Helter Skelter" tour).  The seminar will analyze the history of the Manson murders as well as their incredible resonance in American culture over the past half century. Who was Charles Manson and who were the members of the Family? What was the Family's relation to the counterculture, to Hollywood, Vietnam, the Black Panther Party, and environmentalism? How might we fit the Manson murders into the long history of apocalyptic violence and terror? And what does it mean that the Manson murders have occupied our collective imagination for fifty years? To answer these and other questions, we will analyze a variety of sources including television and newspaper reports, trial transcripts, true crime writing, memoirs, interviews, novels, films and documentaries, podcasts and pop songs.
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AMST 2320 : Latino Music in the US
Crosslisted as: LSP 2320, MUSIC 2320, SPAN 2330 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Music and dance cultures have been central topics of study in the development of Chicano studies, Puerto Rican studies, and Latino studies in general. From Americo Paredes to Frances Aparicio and from Jose Limon to Deborah Pacini-Hernandez, focusing on music and embodied culture through sound has allowed scholars to engage the wide variety of cultural experiences of the different ethnic groups usually described with the term "Latino." Taking this scholarship as a point of departure, this class offers a survey of Latino music in the U.S. as a window into the political, cultural and social that struggles Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Brazilians, Colombians, and Central Americans have gone through while becoming hyphenated (Eg. Mexican-American, Cuban American, etc) or not, and into how these processes have continually challenged and enriched mainstream notions of "American identity."
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AMST 2350 : Archaeology of North American Indians
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2350, ANTHR 2235, ARKEO 2235 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys archaeology's contributions to the study of American Indian cultural diversity and change in North America north of Mexico. Lectures and readings will examine topics ranging from the debate over when the continent was first inhabited to present-day conflicts between Native Americans and archaeologists over excavation and the interpretation of the past. We will review important archaeological sites such as Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, Lamoka Lake, and the Little Bighorn battlefield. A principal focus will be on major transformations in lifeways such as the adoption of agriculture, the development of political-economic hierarchies, and the disruptions that accompanied the arrival of Europeans to the continent.
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AMST 2354 : African American Visions of Africa
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2354, HIST 2354 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 2405 : The Italian-American Experience
Crosslisted as: ITAL 2400 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Between 1880 and 1920, 4 million Italians moved to the United States in search of better fortunes. As a result, today there are 17 million US citizens of Italian descent, among them famed artists and celebrities such as Martin Scorsese, John Turturro, Madonna, and Lady Gaga.  Italian-Americans have left their mark on art, food, music, cinema, and television, creating a new vibrant culture. In this course, we will look at different cultural products that result from this cultural hybridity, chronicling the Italian-American journey from Ellis Island to show business.  The examined texts will include novels, memoirs and films, with particular emphasis on the work of female authors such as Helen Barolini, Kym Ragusa, and Louise de Salvo. Throughout the course, we will grapple with questions of gender and race, hybridity and identity, and we will explore the linguistic and visual strategies used by the authors to suggest a feeling of displacement.
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AMST 2504 : Obama and the Meaning of Race
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2504, GOVT 2604, SOC 2520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The election of Barack Obama to the presidency has raised new questions in the American debate on race, politics, and social science. Has America entered a post-racial society in which racism and inequality are things of the past? Or does Obama's post-Black, race-neutral approach to governing signal the end of Black politics, race-based activism and prescriptive policy? In this course, students will use the Obama presidency to think, talk, and write about how race works in America. We'll examine the symbolism of Obama's personal narrative and biracialism to analyze his race-neutral campaigns and governing within the context of history, politics, and policies. We'll look at the public image of Michelle Obama, especially how she is gendered as Black radical and fashionista.
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AMST 2505 : Playing out Difference: History and Identity in Sports Film
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2501, PMA 2501, VISST 2502 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 2511 : Black Women to 1900
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2511, FGSS 2511, HIST 2511 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the social, cultural and communal lives of black women in North America, beginning with the transatlantic slave trade, and ending in 1900. Topics include Northern and Southern enslavement, first freedoms in the North, Southern emancipation, color consciousness, gener-cross racially and issues of class.
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AMST 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2512, FGSS 2512, HIST 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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AMST 2535 : Music, Politics and Social Movements in the US and the World
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2525, HIST 2525, MUSIC 2525 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 2581 : Environmental History
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2581, HIST 2581 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture course serves as an introduction to the historical study of humanity's interrelationship with the natural world. Environmental history is a quickly evolving field, taking on increasing importance as the environment itself becomes increasingly important in world affairs. During this semester, we'll examine the sometimes unexpected ways in which "natural" forces have shaped human history (the role of germs, for instance, in the colonization of North America); the ways in which human beings have shaped the natural world (through agriculture, urbanization, and industrialization, as well as the formation of things like wildlife preserves); and the ways in which cultural, scientific, political, and philosophical attitudes toward the environment have changed over time. This is designed as an intensely interdisciplinary course: we'll view history through the lenses of ecology, literature, art, film, law, anthropology, and geography. Our focus will be on the United States, but, just as environmental pollutants cross borders, so too will this class, especially toward the end, when we attempt to put U.S. environmental history into a geopolitical context. This course is meant to be open to all, including non-majors and first-year students.
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AMST 2620 : Introduction to Asian American Literature
Crosslisted as: AAS 2620, ENGL 2620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce both a variety of writings by Asian North American authors and some critical issues concerning the production and reception of Asian American texts. Working primarily with novels, we will be asking questions about the relation between literary forms and the socio-historical context within which they take on their meanings, and about the historical formation of Asian American identities.
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AMST 2621 : Gendering Religion, Science and Technology
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2621, STS 2621 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
There are several "just-so stories" about science and religion: the world's religions are parallel systems of belief in the supernatural; science has a set method that produces universal truths; and religion and science are in perpetual conflict. This course will challenge these understandings by introducing students to the study of religion, science, and technology, as well as to ways to think about their relationships. To bring these categories down to earth and unsettle engrained scholarly and popular narratives, our approach will be to gender the study of religion, science, and technology. To do so, we will not simply "add women and stir," to borrow a phrase from feminist historians; rather, we will query how gender, sexuality, and embodiment shape the very construction of knowledge itself.
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AMST 2640 : Introduction to Asian American History
Crosslisted as: AAS 2130, HIST 2640 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introductory history of Chinese, Japanese, Asian Indians, Filipinos, and Koreans in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1990s. Major themes include racism and resistance, labor migration, community formation, imperialism, and struggles for equality.
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AMST 2655 : Latinos in the United States
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2650, LSP 2010, SOC 2650 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Exploration and analysis of the Hispanic experience in the United States. Examines the sociohistorical background and economic, psychological, and political factors that converge to shape a Latino group identity in the United States. Perspectives are suggested and developed for understanding Hispanic migrations, the plight of Latinos in urban and rural areas, and the unique problems faced by the diverse Latino groups. Groups studied include Mexican Americans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans.
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AMST 2660 : Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong: Unlearning Native American History
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2660, HIST 2660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
One thing many Americans think they know is their Indians: Pocahontas, the First Thanksgiving, fighting cowboys, reservation poverty, and casino riches. Under our very noses, however, Native American history has evolved into one of the most exciting, dynamic, and contentious fields of inquiry into America's past. It is now safer to assume, as Comanche historian Paul Chaat Smith has pointed out, that everything you know about Indians is in fact wrong. Most people have much to "unlearn" about Native American history before true learning can take place. This course aims to achieve that end by (re)introducing students to key themes and trends in the history of North America's indigenous nations. Employing an issues-oriented approach, the course stresses the ongoing complexity of Native American societies' engagements with varieties of settler colonialism since 1492 and dedicates itself to a concerted program of myth-busting. As such, the course will provide numerous opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking and reading skills.
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AMST 2665 : The American Revolutionary Era
Crosslisted as: HIST 2665 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
As we approach the 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, this course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the origins, character, and results of the American Revolution, as well as engaging the enduring significance of its memory in contemporary American life - why do we choose to remember the American Revolution in ways that occlude its divisive and bloody events? This course explores many of the key themes of this critical period of American history: the rise of colonial opposition to Great Britain, the nature of the Revolutionary Wars, and the domestic "republican experiment" that followed the Treaty of Paris in 1783. The course emphasizes student interpretations with an eye toward analyzing the comparative experiences of women and men, "everyday people" and famous leaders, Native Americans, African-Americans, and those who opposed the Revolution.
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AMST 2680 : Culture and Politics of the 1960s
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2680 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Fifty years ago, American society exploded; but 1968 was only a moment in the decade when the civil rights movement, the counter culture, and the Vietnam war stimulated alternative lifestyles and powerful dissents that changed the world forever. What can the triumphant and tragic events of the 1960s, and the literary works they inspired, teach a later generation living through a similar crisis of social transformation? This interdisciplinary course puts cultural texts in the context of a turbulent history. Topics include racial justice, the antiwar movement, the New Left, second-wave feminism, gay and lesbian rights, and the music of resistance. Texts will include The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove, Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, music of Dylan and Joplin, speeches of King, manifestos, memoirs, and poems.
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AMST 2682 : The United States in the 1960s and 1970s
Crosslisted as: HIST 2680 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This lecture course explores the dramatic cultural, economic, and social upheavals in U.S. society during the 1960s and 1970s. It will primarily focus on the dynamic interactions between formal politics, the state, the economy, and the era's mass movements on the right and the left. Among other things, we will explore the history and legacy of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the Vietnam War, deindustrialization, "white flight," the War on Poverty, the War on Crime, Watergate, the "rise of the right," and women's changing roles.
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AMST 2710 : America's Promise: Social and Political Context of American Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 5710, DSOC 2710, DSOC 5710, EDUC 2710, EDUC 5710, SOC 2710, SOC 5710 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is a blending of the Sociology of Education and Public Policy. Front and center in this course is the question of why consistent differential educational and economic outcomes exists in American society. We explore the broad sociological functions of schooling (socialization, sorting, caretaking, training) as well as local, state, and federal policies and court decisions.
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AMST 2721 : Anthropological Representation: Ethnographies of Latino Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2721, LSP 2721 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Representation is basic to anthropology. In the process of translating societies and cultures, anthropologists produce authoritative accounts about other people, their lives, and their communities. We will here examine, from a critical perspective, the production of representations on Latino culture[s] in anthropological texts. Issues to be explored include the relation between the ethnographer and the people s/he is studying, the contexts in which ethnographic texts are produced, the ways these texts may contribute to the position that different cultural groups have within the United States, and the implications emanating from these processes.
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AMST 2735 : Children's Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An historical study of children's literature from the 17th century to the present, principally in Europe and America, which will explore changing literary forms in relation to the social history of childhood. Ranging from oral folktale to contemporary novelistic realism (with some glances at film narrative), major figures may include Perrault, Newbery, the Grimms, Andersen, Carroll, Alcott, Stevenson, Burnett, Kipling, the Disney studio, E. B. White, C. S. Lewis, Sendak, Silverstein, Mildred Taylor, and Bette Greene. We'll also encounter a variety of critical models—psychoanalytic, materialist, feminist, structuralist—that scholars have employed to explain the variety and importance of children's literature. Finally, we will consider how the idea of "the child" has evolved over this period.
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AMST 2760 : American Cinema
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2761, PMA 2560, VISST 2300 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
From the beginning of the twentieth century to the present moment, movies -- and in particular Hollywood -- have profoundly influenced the ways in which people see, think and talk about the world. Focusing mostly on Hollywood film, this course introduces the study of American cinema from multiple perspectives: as an economy and mode of production; as an art form that produces particular aesthetic styles; as a cultural institution that comments on contemporary issues and allows people to socialize. We will consider the rise of Hollywood in the age of mass production; the star system; the introduction of sound and the function of the soundtrack; Hollywood's rivalry with television; censorship; the rise of independent film, etc. Weekly screenings introduce major American genres (e.g. science fiction, film noir, the musical) and directors (e.g. Hitchcock, Kubrick, Tarantino).
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AMST 2770 : Representing Racial Encounters/Encountering Racial Representations
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2770, ENGL 2770, LSP 2770 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This team-taught course uses literature and popular culture, alongside literary, social, and cultural theory to consider how people from different cultures encounter and experience each other. The course explores travel from multiple perspectives, the concept of dark tourism, and the cultural industry of racial representation. Designed for the general student population, the course specifically appeals to students traveling abroad, or who in the future will work with diverse communities (for example, students with interests in medicine, law, labor, government, business, the hospitality industry, or in the fields of gender, queer, or ethnic studies). The course serves as an introduction to the critical inquiries and scholarly fields of the English department.
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AMST 3010 : Photography and the American Dream
Crosslisted as: ART 3810, ARTH 3010, VISST 3010 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Who are 'the poor' in the United States? Who are the largest recipients of federal welfare and entitlement spending? Why is there an unprecedented simultaneous increase in wealth and poverty in the United States at this point in its history? What role does photography play in our understanding and misunderstanding of poverty in 'the greatest country in the world?' In this course we will explore the perceptions of poverty in the United States through three major American newspapers.
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AMST 3012 : The Politics of Poverty in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3012 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Poverty is a phenomenon of enduring importance with significant implications for democratic governance. This course explores contemporary poverty in America, with a particular emphasis on its political causes and consequences. What is the proper role of government in addressing poverty? Under what conditions are the poor able to gain power despite their relative lack of privilege? What is the relationship between race and poverty? How do notions of "culture" shape conceptualizations of the poor? We will tackle these questions by drawing on insights from seminal texts in political science and sociology, supplemented with journalistic accounts of poverty.
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AMST 3033 : Politics of Public Policy in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3032 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Public policies are political outcomes determined by processes that are complex, convoluted and often controversial. The aim of this course is to equip students with the conceptual tools necessary to understand these processes. We will begin with a review of popular approaches to studying policy and then move on to explore the various stages of policy development: agenda-setting, policy design, policy implementation, policy feedback and policy change. We will consider the roles played by both institutions (congress, the bureaucracy and interests groups) and everyday people. Finally, we will closely study several specific policy arenas (a few likely candidates include: education policy, health policy, social welfare policy and housing policy). As we engage all of these ideas, students will be consistently challenged to grapple with the paradoxes of policy making in a democratic polity and to envision pathways for substantive political change.  
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AMST 3082 : American Political Campaigns
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3082 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on political campaigns, a central feature of American democracy. We will examine how they work and the conditions under which they affect citizens' decisions. The course looks at campaign strategies and attributes of candidates, as well as how and whether they affect key outcomes such as the decision to turn out, who to vote for, and whether to spend money and volunteer time helping favored candidates win.
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AMST 3131 : The Nature, Functions, and Limits of Law
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3131, LAW 4131 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A general-education course to acquaint students with how our legal system pursues the goals of society. The course introduces students to various perspectives on the nature of law, what functions it ought to serve in society, and what it can and cannot accomplish. The course proceeds in the belief that such matters constitute a valuable and necessary part of a general education, not only for pre-law students but especially for students in other fields. Assigned readings comprise legal materials and also secondary sources on the legal process and the role of law in society. The classes include discussion and debate about current legal and social issues, including equality, safety, the environment, punishment, and autonomy.
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AMST 3140 : U.S. in the World
Crosslisted as: CAPS 3140, HIST 3140 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students examine the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century. The course focuses on the domestic sources of foreign policy and the assumptions of the major policy makers (Wilson through Bush), as well as U.S. relations with pivotal global actors. Important themes include the American response to a revolutionary world since 1912, American response to colonialism and anticolonialism, and role of different areas of government, from the president to the CIA, in the making of U.S. foreign policy.
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AMST 3142 : Incarceration, Policy Response, and Self-Reflection
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3142 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This class is intended to provoke some hard thinking about the relationship of committed "outsiders" and advocates of change to the experience of crime, punishment, and incarceration and to the men we meet at Auburn/Cayuga who have been in most instances long-confined to prison. We will read, think, talk and write about the incarceration experience and about policies that shape this experience. We will also think self-reflexively about the character of the 'outsider's' educational, political, and personal engagement.   What are the motivations and what are the goals of such engagement? What are the anticipated outcomes - personal, social, educational, political, and/or moral and perhaps spiritual? In an effort to delve deeply into these questions, we will read a broad selection of work on incarceration, itself, as well as on the experience of what has come to be termed service learning or civic engagement.
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AMST 3161 : The American Presidency
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3161 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore and seek explanations for the performance of the 20-21st century presidency, focusing on its institutional and political development, recruitment process (nominations and elections), relationships to social groups, economic forces, and "political time."  We will also analyze the parameters of foreign & domestic policy making.
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AMST 3185 : Living in an Uncertain World: Science, Technology, and Risk
Crosslisted as: BSOC 3181, HIST 3181, STS 3181 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the history, sociology, and ethics of risk. In particular, we will focus on the complex and often ambiguous relationship between science, technology, and risk. A historical perspective shows how science and technology have generated risks while they have also played key roles in managing and solving those very risks. By examining several case studies, including 19th-century mining, the 1911 Triangle fire, nuclear science, the space shuttle disasters, asbestos litigation, Hurricane Katrina, and the contemporary financial crisis, we will consider how risk and ideas about risk have changed over time. By exploring different historical and cultural responses to risk, we will examine the sociopolitical dimensions of the definitions, perceptions, and management of risk both in the past and the present.
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AMST 3230 : American Economic History I
Crosslisted as: ECON 3310 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Surveys problems in American economic history from the first settlements to early industrialization.
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AMST 3248 : Finger Lakes and Beyond: Archaeology of the Native Northeast
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3248, AIIS 6248, AMST 6248, ANTHR 3248, ANTHR 6248, ARKEO 3248, ARKEO 6248 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a long-term overview of the indigenous peoples of Cornell's home region and their neighbors from an archaeological perspective.  Cornell students live and work in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, or Six Nations Iroquois, and this class will help residents to understand the deep history of this place. We will examine long-term changes in material culture, settlement, subsistence, and trade; the founding of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy; indigenous responses to European and American colonization; the practicalities of doing indigenous-site archaeology in New York State; and contemporary indigenous perspectives on archaeology. Visits to local archaeological sites and museum collections will supplement classroom instruction.
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AMST 3281 : Constitutional Politics: The U.S. Supreme Court
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3281, LAW 3281 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course investigates the United States Supreme Court and its role in politics and government. It traces the development of constitutional doctrine, the growth of the Court's institutional power, and the Court's interaction with Congress, the president, and society. Discussed are major constitutional law decisions, their political contexts, and the social and behavioral factors that affect judges, justices, and federal court jurisprudence.
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AMST 3330 : Ways of Knowing: Indigenous and Place-Based Ecological Knowledge
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3330, NTRES 3330, NTRES 6330 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Based on indigenous and place-based "ways of knowing," this course (1) presents a theoretical and humanistic framework from which to understand generation of ecological knowledge; (2) examines processes by which to engage indigenous and place-based knowledge of natural resources, the nonhuman environment, and human-environment interactions; and (3) reflects upon the relevance of this knowledge to climatic change, resource extraction, food sovereignty, medicinal plant biodiversity, and issues of sustainability and conservation.  The fundamental premise of this course is that human beings are embedded in their ecological systems.
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AMST 3360 : American Drama and Theatre
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3360, PMA 3757 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Explores major American playwrights from 1900 to 1960, introducing students to American theatre as a significant part of modern American cultural history. We will consider the ways in which theatre has contributed to the construction and deconstruction of a national identity. Similarly, we will examine the influence of the American Theatre on and in film. We will pay special attention to the social, political, and aesthetic contexts of the time period and discuss the shifting popularity of dramatic forms, including melodrama, realism, expressionism, absurdism, and the folk play, in the American theatre canon. Authors include O'Neill, Glaspell, Odets, Rice, Hellman, Hughes, Miller, Williams, and Albee, among others.
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AMST 3380 : Urban Inequality
Crosslisted as: SOC 3380 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is a seminar course on urban inequality in the United States.  The first half of the semester will be dedicated to understanding the political, historical, and social determinants of inequality in America's cities. Politically and socially, cities face unique challenges. Municipalities lack much formal authority to resolve issues that arise within their borders, and their populations are highly heterogeneous in terms of ethnicity, race, and social class. In the second half of the course, we will investigate a number of contemporary facets of urban inequality in-depth, such as residential segregation, urban schooling, immigration, and suburban sprawl.
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AMST 3405 : Multicultural Issues in Education
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3405, EDUC 3405, LSP 3405 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores research on race, ethnicity and language in American education. It examines historical and current patterns of school achievement for minoritized youths. It also examines the cultural and social premises undergirding educational practices in diverse communities and schools. Policies, programs and pedagogy, including multicultural and bilingual education, are explored.
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AMST 3463 : Contemporary Television
Crosslisted as: PMA 3463, VISST 3463 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course considers issues, approaches, and complexities in the contemporary television landscape. As television has changed drastically over the past fifteen years, this course provides students with a deeper understanding of the changes in narratives, technologies, forms, and platforms that structure/restructure the televisual world. Students will grapple with how "new media" forms such as web-series and on-demand internet streaming services have changed primetime television. We will balance our look at television shows with nuanced readings about the televisual media industry. By watching, analyzing, and critiquing the powerful medium of television, students will situate their understanding within a broader consideration of the medium's regulation, production, distribution, and reception in the network and post-network era.
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AMST 3475 : Nueva York: Caribbean Urbanisms
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3470, LATA 3470, LSP 3470, SPAN 3470 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
To what extent is New York City part of the Caribbean? This course explores the ways in which writers from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic write New York, whether as tourists, residents, or exiles. We will read about places like Coney Island, Wall Street, Chinatown, Harlem, the Bronx, the Village, the World Trade Center, and Washington Heights. Beginning with the chronicles of José Martí and other Cubans in the late 19th century, we then turn our attention to surrealist visions of catastrophe (1920s & 30s), followed by Nuyorico (1950s), Bronx hip hop (1970s), the gay underground scene (late 1970s & early 80s), 9/11, and the contemporary Dominican diaspora in Upper Manhattan. Topics include exile, nostalgia, transnationalism, imperialism, aesthetics, performance, race, and sexuality.   
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AMST 3515 : Blaxploitation Film and Photography
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3505, ASRC 3505, FGSS 3505, PMA 3505, VISST 3505 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Blaxploitation films of the 1970s are remembered for their gigantic Afros, enormous guns, slammin' soundtracks, sex, drugs, nudity, and violence. Never before or since have so many African American performers been featured in starring roles. Macho male images were projected alongside strong, yet sexually submissive female ones. But how did these images affect the roles that black men and women played on and off the screen and the portrayal of the black body in contemporary society? This interdisciplinary course explores the range of ideas and methods used by critical thinkers in addressing the body in art, film, photography and the media. We will consider how the display of the black body affects how we see and interpret the world by examining the construction of beauty, fashion, hairstyles and gendered images as well as sexuality, violence, race, and hip-hop culture.
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AMST 3560 : Modeling Race, Fashioning Beauty
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3550, FGSS 3540 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores written and visual biographies of African American and African women in the fashion industry as a launching point for thinking about beauty, race, gender and class. Some of the questions that will be explored during the semester are: How do ethnicity and femininity intersect? How are authenticity and difference commodified? How do women construct identities through narrative or craft themselves through body modification? How do women negotiate their relationships to their bodies, families and nations? Contemporary television programs, global fashion and cultural studies will also be discussed. Students will write self-narratives about their relationships with cultural standards of beauty.
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AMST 3562 : Thinking from a Different Place: Indigenous Philosophies
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3560, ENGL 3560 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Western nation-state has failed to solve the two most pressing, indeed catastrophic, global problems: poverty and climate change. This failure is due to the inability of national policy to imagine a world beyond a boundary drawn by the formative capitalist ideas of property, production, and profit. The course will begin by discussing the historical origin and continuing force of these ideas while raising questions about their limits. Then it will look at a range of alternative ideas about how the world should work if we want to keep it socially, economically, and ecologically in balance. The alternatives we will query come from a range of Indigenous writers of fiction, poetry, and theory, who locate themselves in Native American (north and south), Aboriginal, and Maori communities.
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AMST 3590 : The Black Radical Tradition in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3590, HIST 3590 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a critical historical interrogation of what Black Marxism author Cedric Robinson called "the Black Radical Tradition." It will introduce students to some of the major currents in the history of black radical thought, action, and organizing, with an emphasis on the United States after World War I. It relies on social, political, and intellectual history to examine the efforts of black people who have sought not merely social reform, but a fundamental restructuring of political, economic, and social relations. We will define and evaluate radicalism in the shifting contexts of liberation struggles. We will explore dissenting visions of social organization and alternative definitions of citizenship, progress, and freedom. We will confront the meaning of the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality in social movements.
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AMST 3650 : Nineteenth-Century American Poetry and Prose
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3650 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Powerful voices emerged in the United States' first hundred years that continue to reverberate and to shape the ways in which we understand ourselves as Americans.  We will give special attention in this course to the groundbreaking poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson and to the visionary prose of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau.  We'll consider the central place of slavery, abolitionism and the Civil War in the development of American ideals of freedom, selfhood, and political resistance, as reflected in writings by Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and Margaret Fuller among others.  And we will explore the wide variety of verse produced by popular poets like William Cullen Bryant, Edgar Allan Poe, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
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AMST 3661 : Reading the Nineteenth-Century American Novel
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The course asks you to think about the role of fiction in producing a sense of history, politics, and culture in the nineteenth-century United States. In particular, we will think about the relations among stylistic concerns in fiction and the construction of identities formed by national, racial, gendered, and sexual allegiances. Authors include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Pauline Hopkins, and Fanny Fern.
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AMST 3670 : Modern American Fiction
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3670 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to recent American fiction through close reading of novels and short fiction since 1970. Some consistent themes will be resistance and revolt, ideas of gender, race and identity, power and marginality, history and memory, and definitions of America. We'll also consider the texts as experiments in language, form, and aesthetic pleasure. Readings may include Doctorow's The Book of Daniel, Kingston's The Woman Warrior, Alexie's Reservation Blues, stories by Donald Barthelme and Alice Munro, Morrison's Beloved, and Viramontes' Their Dogs Came with Them.
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AMST 3675 : The Environmental Imagination in American Literature
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3675 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on works that exemplify environmental consciousness—a sense that humans are not the center of the world and that to think they are may have catastrophic consequences for humans themselves. Environmental literature is not just a major strand of American literature but one of its most distinctive contributions to the literature of the world. We will be reading works mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries, both poetry and fiction, confronting the challenges of thinking and writing with an ecological consciousness in the 21st. Cornell being a rich environment in which to pursue such investigations, creative projects will be encouraged. Inspiration is assured.
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AMST 3690 : The Race and Gender of Poverty in Literature and Film
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3690, FGSS 3691 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Poverty is an ongoing issue in the United States, and has intensified since the recession of 2008. As such, poverty has disproportionately affected women and underrepresented racial and ethnic communities. This course will analyze this issue through its representation in film and literature, both fiction and non-fiction.
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AMST 3703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 3030, ANTHR 3703, ANTHR 6703 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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AMST 3733 : Culinary Fictions, Literary Cuisines
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3733, FGSS 3733 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
When is a cookbook not a cookbook? When it's a memoir, of course! Why would a novelist make a chef the protagonist of a story? What's the pay-off for a poet in choosing a plum as the subject of a poem? This couse will explore these and other literary food-related questions. Through a focus on the ways that writers use the language of food to explore issues such as gender, power, race and nation, we will ask what food can tell us about the dynamic of power and its circulation in US culture. We will read novels, poems, memoirs and even a cookbook or two. Writers under consideration may include Diana Abu-Jaber, Margaret Atwood, MFK Fisher, Ruth Ozeki, Monique Truong, Helena María Viramontes, and William Carlos Williams, among others.
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AMST 3755 :
Crosslisted as: AAS 3750, ENGL 3960, VISST 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 3760 : American Cinema since 1968
Crosslisted as: PMA 3560, VISST 3760 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1968, amongst cultural and political turmoil, the American film industry adopted the ratings system, which helped usher in the kinds of cinema we know today. This course focuses on developments in U.S. cinema since then: its politics, technological and economic transformations, relationship to other media, and changing ways in which people consume it. A main focus will be the aesthetic developments of films themselves: new and changing genres, new visual styles, new ways of storytelling, and ways in which new voices and visions have emerged. Weekly screenings will include mainstream, independent, and documentary films. The course can be taken as a complement to "American Cinema" (AMST 2760) or independently.
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AMST 3820 : Poetry and Poetics of the Americas
Crosslisted as: COML 3800, ENGL 3910, LATA 3800, SPAN 3800 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
As globalization draws the Americas ever closer together, reshaping our sense of a common and uncommon American culture, what claims might be made for a distinctive, diverse poetry and poetics of the America? How might we characterize its dominant forms and alternative practices? What shared influences, affiliations, concerns and approaches might we find and what differences emerge? Ranging across North and South America, Central America and the Caribbean, this course will place in conversation such figures as Poe, Stein, Eliot, Pound, Williams, Neruda, Vallejo, Borges, Parra, Césaire, Walcott, Bolaño, Espada, Waldrop, Vicuña, Hong, and Rankine.
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AMST 3854 : Special Topics in Regional Development and Globalization
Crosslisted as: CRP 3854, GOVT 3494 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course addresses pertinent issues relative to the subject of regional development and globalization. Topics vary each semester.
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AMST 3870 : The History of Consumption: From Wedgwood to Wal-Mart
Crosslisted as: HIST 3870, ILRLR 3870 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Whether buying at a general store, shopping at a department store, or loitering at a mall, consumption has always formed an important part of the American experience. More than just commodities bought and sold, consumption is also about the institutions, social practices, cultural meanings, and economic functions that have surrounded the merchandise. This course will look at the changing meanings consumption has had for life, politics, and economy in the US over the past 300 years.
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AMST 3980 : Independent Research
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Affords opportunities for students to carry out independent research under appropriate supervision. Each student is expected to review pertinent literature, prepare a project outline, conduct the research, and prepare a report. Topic and credit hours TBD as arranged between faculty and student.
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AMST 3980 : Independent Research
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Affords opportunities for students to carry out independent research under appropriate supervision. Each student is expected to review pertinent literature, prepare a project outline, conduct the research, and prepare a report. Topic and credit hours TBD as arranged between faculty and student.
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AMST 3990 : Readings in American Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Individualized readings for junior and senior students. Topics, requirements, and credit hours will be determined in consultation between the student and the supervising faculty member.
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AMST 3990 : Readings in American Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Individualized readings for junior and senior students. Topics, requirements, and credit hours will be determined in consultation between the student and the supervising faculty member.
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AMST 4021 : American Conservative Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4021 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
American conservative thought rests on assumptions that are strikingly different from those made by mainstream American liberals.  However, conservative thinkers are themselves committed to principles that are both quite varied and sometimes contradictory.  This course examines the assumptions upon which rest the libertarian, market/economic, and cultural/traditional strains of American conservatism and asks whether the tensions between them weaken or strengthen conservative thought as an alternative to mainstream liberalism.
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AMST 4031 : Social Movements in American Politics: Then and Now
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4031 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Social movements are collective efforts through which people at the margins of power unite to press their grievances on the state. It is difficult to name a major political reform that did not begin with a social movement. They are essential to the functioning of democracy.
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AMST 4039 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4390, ASRC 6391, HIST 4390, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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AMST 4039 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4390, ASRC 6391, HIST 4390, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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AMST 4130 : Service Learning for Democratic Citizenship: Literature of American Social Action Movements
Crosslisted as: WRIT 4130 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To what extent is civic engagement fundamental to democratic citizenship? This course seeks to answer that question by exploring the components of service learning as a discipline and to strengthen the intellectual foundation of students who wish to incorporate civic engagement into their curriculum. Students will become familiar with the history of service learning, explore competing theories of social justice and social inequality, and develop a framework for social action that exists at the juncture of theory and practice. Readings will include texts by Dewey, Freire, bell hooks, Franklin, Jefferson, Thoreau, Addams, Baldwin, King, Dorothy Day, and Fanon. Weekly seminar papers as well as a term paper through which students develop their own philosophy of civic engagement.
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AMST 4194 : American Shakespeare
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4291, PMA 4190 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What is distinctive about American Shakespeare? Is it merely a less confident cousin of its more prestigious UK relative; or does it have a character of its own? What is currently happening with 'American Shakespeare' that is not happening anywhere else? This course is designed explicitly to exploit the wide variety of human and material resources of the DC and surrounding area, such as the Folger Shakespeare Library and Theatre, the Shakespeare Theatre and the Blackfriars Playhouse at Staunton. While encountering a number of plays, students will have the opportunity to see at least three live performances and numerous movies, consider the history of Shakespeare in America and learn from actors, directors, scholars and designers.
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AMST 4203 : Contesting Votes: Democracy and Citizenship Throughout U.S. History
Crosslisted as: HIST 4203 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This advanced seminar traces transformations in citizenship and the franchise throughout U.S. history. Through readings, frequent short writings, discussion, and a final paper, the class examines the struggles over who can claim full citizenship and legitimate voice in the political community. It examines the divergent, often clashing, visions of legitimate democratic rule, focusing particularly on the debates over who should vote and on what terms.  We examine the dynamics that have shaped the boundaries of citizenship and hierarchies within it, paying attention to changes in the civic status of Native Americans, property-less white men, paupers, women, African Americans, various immigrant groups, residents of U.S. colonies, felons, and people with intellectual disabilities. A significant portion of the class focuses on debates about U.S. democracy in the decades after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.
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AMST 4220 : Locke and the Philosophies of Dispossession: Indigenous America's Interruptions and Resistances
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4200, AIIS 6200, AMST 6220, PHIL 4941, PHIL 6941 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course looks at the philosopher John Locke as a philosopher of dispossession. There is a uniquely Lockean mode of missionization, conception of mind and re-formulations of the 'soul' applied to dispossess Indigenous peoples of the social institutions, intellectual traditions and the material bases and practices which sustain(ed) them. While colonization is typically used as a kind of shorthand for this process, we will be attempting to stay focused on the specific dimensions of Lockean dispossession and its mutually informing relationship with English colonialism.
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AMST 4272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 6272, ANTHR 4272, ANTHR 7272, ARKEO 4272, ARKEO 7272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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AMST 4402 : Women in Hip Hop
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4102, ASRC 4402, FGSS 4402, LGBT 4402 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 4516 : Sociology of Race & Education
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4516, ASRC 6516, SOC 4520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We will undertake an in-depth study of racial inequality and its relationship to schooling. The course content is centered primarily on the schooling challenges facing Black, Latino, Asian, and Native American students. We will investigate how issues such as the resegregation of schools, academic tracking, and teacher quality impact student achievement. The course reviews classic theoretical perspectives in the sociology of education, including education as social reproduction or cultural capital. Special attention will be given to the conceptualization and measurement of racial gaps in standardized test scores since the 1970s. We will also give some attention to how the debates surrounding race and education are influenced by popular discourse, including film documentaries.
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AMST 4519 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4509, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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AMST 4565 : Traffic: Drugs, Bodies, Books
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4565, LATA 4565, LSP 4565 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 4619 : Writing on Tape in the 1970s
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4619, MUSIC 4454, SHUM 4619 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the way audiotape both corrupted and enabled the aesthetic and political culture of the 1970s. The possibilities of editing (via the cut, the loop, or the overdub) on one hand, and the seeming capacity for indiscriminate recording of sound on the other, revealed tape to be a medium with claims both for authentic documentation (and also surveillance), and wide aesthetic reference (but also mass deception). With one ear to the state and another to the music industry, this course will focus on the way politics and the arts responded to and incorporated the new technology. Authors include Andy Warhol, Alvin Lucier, Hunter S. Thompson, William S. Burroughs, The Last Poets, The Firesign Theatre, The Credibility Gap, Adrian Piper.
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AMST 4620 : Undocumentation
Crosslisted as: COML 4616, FGSS 4620, LATA 4620, LSP 4621, ROMS 4625, SHUM 4620, VISST 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will sustain a particular reading of post-1984 Mexico-US border cultural production as "undocumentation." Specifically, we will focus on performance, conceptual, and cinematic practices that corrupt the spreadsheet and the exposé; that reflect their makers' commitments to portraying extreme labor situations in a period of greater Mexican neoliberal transition now synonymous with NAFTA, culture and drug wars, and border militarization and maquilization. Assigned texts will include artwork by the Border Art Workshop and Elizabeth Sisco, Louis Hock, and David Avalos; writing by Gloria Anzaldúa, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Sara Uribe, and Sergio González Rodríguez; contributions to the Tijuana-San Diego installation festival inSITE; and "undocumentaries" like Alex Rivera's Borders Trilogy, Sergio De La Torre and Vicki Funari's Maquilapolis, and Natalia Almada's El Velador.
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AMST 4626 : Disobedience, Resistance, Refusal
Crosslisted as: AMST 6627, GOVT 4626, PHIL 4427, PHIL 6427, SHUM 4627, SHUM 6627 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar surveys contemporary political theories of disobedience and resistance. We will examine liberal, republican, and radical perspectives on the logic of political protest, its functions, justifications, and limits, as well as how transformations in law, economy, and technology are redefining dissent in the twenty-first century. Topics to be discussed will include the terms of political obligation, the relationship between law-breaking and law-making, conceptions of justice, resistance and popular sovereignty, the politics of civility, violence and self-defense, public space and privatization, the digitalization of protest, resistance in non-democratic regimes, as well as deviance and refusal as modes of dissent.
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AMST 4633 : Art! Poetry! Power!
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4635, ENGL 4635, LSP 4635 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course begins in the center of the poetry, politics, and art of the U.S. civil rights movements, but also makes connections with the poetic and visual cultures of twenty-first century activism. Our exploration commences through a set of questions to guide our critical inquiry: Does art produce political resistance? Does art produce political consciousness? How can we read poster art and murals as texts or narratives? How does poetry perform or visualize a collective movement and political moment? By centering our study on these questions, we will move through the poster art, murals, and poems of Chicanos/as, U.S. Latinos/as, and African Americans during the 1960s and 1970s. Reading visual image, political proclamations, and spoken word as cultural texts, we will examine art and poetry for their knowledges about community, ethnicity, and racial experience in the U.S.
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AMST 4670 : Native American Poetry of Resistance
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4670, ENGL 4670 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What techniques, tools, and contexts are needed to perform reasonably well-informed readings and interpretations of Native American poetry? If a poem illuminates an injustice, what historical context do we need to know? When a poet depicts a humorous image or celebrates the body of a lover, does the poem – by virtue of its authorship – disturb stereotypes? These questions and more will direct our inquiry into how Indigenous poets represent and strategically re-invent Euro-American literary forms to revitalize Indigenous aesthetic traditions and register resistance to oppression. We'll read numerous Indigenous poetic voices from across the continent, and see how they range from caustic criticism of EuroAmerican values, celebrate Indigenous relationships to place, and reject the role of victim or subjugation through trickster play and humor.
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AMST 4705 : Nightlife
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4701, LGBT 4701, LSP 4701, LSP 6701, PMA 4701, PMA 6701 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores nightlife as a temporality that fosters countercultural performances of the self and that serves as a site for the emergence of alternative kinship networks.  Focusing on queer communities of color, course participants will be asked to interrogate the ways in which nightlife demonstrates the queer world-making potential that exists beyond the normative 9-5 capitalist model of production. Performances of the everyday, alongside films, texts, and performance art, will be analyzed through a performance studies methodological lens.  Through close readings and sustained cultural analysis, students will acquire a critical understanding of the potentiality of spaces, places, and geographies codified as "after hours" in the development of subcultures, alternative sexualities, and emerging performance practices.
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AMST 4720 : New Latinx Writing
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4720, ENGL 6720, LSP 4720, LSP 6720 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Contemporary Latinx writing explores an extraordinary range of experiences using a variety of experimental forms. This course will examine the poetry, fiction, memoirs, plays, and new media produced within the last fifteen years by a new generation of Latinx writers and artists. We will consider how writers queer Latinidad, play with gender norms, question received concepts of race and culture, and examine the constraints imposed by immigration laws and de facto practices of segregation. Authors may include Justin Torres, Sandra Cisneros, Eduardo Corral, Erika Lopez, Junot Diaz, Helena Viramontes, and Lin-Manuel Miranda.
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AMST 4733 : The Future of Whiteness
Crosslisted as: AMST 6733, ASRC 4733, ENGL 4733, ENGL 6733 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How should decent, anti-racist people respond to the new racialized white identities that have emerged recently in Europe and the United States? What alternative conceptions of whiteness are available? How can we form cross-racial progressive coalitions? How should we understand the nature of our social identities and what they make possible? This course is a wide-ranging introduction to these questions with readings drawn from social and cultural theory, as well as literature and film. Texts by such writers as Rudyard Kipling, William Faulkner, E. M. Forster, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison and Dorothy Allison, as well as relevant anthropological and social-theoretical work (on racial identities, whiteness studies, etc.) and memoirs of anti-racist activists. A central text will be the new book The Future of Whiteness by the Latina feminist philosopher Linda Martin Alcoff. 
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AMST 4900 : New World Encounters, 1500 - 1800
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4900, HIST 4900, HIST 6900 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The discovery of the Americas, wrote Francisco Lopez de Gomara in 1552, was "the greatest event since the creation of the world, excepting the Incarnation and Death of Him who created." Five centuries have not diminished either the overwhelming importance or the strangeness of the early encounter between Europeans and the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Taking a comparative approach, this course will conceptualize early American history as the product of reciprocal cultural encounters by assessing the various experiences of Spanish, French, and English newcomers in different regions of the Americas. Critical interpretation of primary source material will be emphasized in the course, as will the development of students' ability to reflect critically on these documents, taking into account the perspective of both the colonizers and the colonized. 
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AMST 4993 : Honors Essay Tutorial I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, AMST majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an AMST faculty member and defend that thesis orally before a committee. Students interested in the honors program should consult the AMST director during the junior year and submit an honors application by May 1 of the junior year.
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AMST 4994 : Honors Essay Tutorial II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, AMST majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an AMST faculty member and defend that thesis orally before a committee. Students interested in the honors program should consult the AMST director during the junior year and submit an honors application by May 1 of the junior year.
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AMST 5710 : America's Promise: Social and Political Context of American Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 2710, DSOC 2710, DSOC 5710, EDUC 2710, EDUC 5710, SOC 2710, SOC 5710 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Examines the goals, roles, inputs, and outcomes of schooling in American society, and the policy environment in which schools operate. Analyzes controversies and tensions (e.g., equity, market forces, state control) surrounding public education at local, state, and federal levels. Includes current and historical, urban, and rural issues and problems.
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AMST 6011 : The American State
Crosslisted as: GOVT 6011 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The American state is depicted by many scholars as small and unusual, and yet in many respects it has been at least as involved in American society and the economy as that of other nations. How is the work of governance carried out in the United States? What kinds of institutional arrangements are employed, and how have they developed? What are the consequences for governance? Answering these questions immerses us in the study of American political development to assess the evolution, character, and scope of the administrative state and of other arrangements-typically channeled through the private sector-through which the nation implements public policies. In the processes, the course grapples with analytical questions about processes of political change and considers a variety of theoretical approaches. Variants of "new institutionalism" will be highlighted, as well as reflections on the puzzles of American exceptionalism. The body of the course will investigate such topics as the development of public bureaucracy, the emergence of the civil service, and the evolution of the regulatory state and the welfare state. The course examines the late nineteenth century through the present, focusing primarily on the twentieth century.
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AMST 6202 : Political Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6102, GOVT 6202, HIST 6202, SOC 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.
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AMST 6220 : Locke and the Philosophies of Dispossession: Indigenous America's Interruptions and Resistances
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4200, AIIS 6200, AMST 4220, PHIL 4941, PHIL 6941 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course looks at the philosopher John Locke as a philosopher of dispossession. There is a uniquely Lockean mode of missionization, conception of mind and re-formulations of the 'soul' applied to dispossess Indigenous peoples of the social institutions, intellectual traditions and the material bases and practices which sustain(ed) them. While colonization is typically used as a kind of shorthand for this process, we will be attempting to stay focused on the specific dimensions of Lockean dispossession and its mutually informing relationship with English colonialism.
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AMST 6248 : Finger Lakes and Beyond: Archaeology of the Native Northeast
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3248, AIIS 6248, AMST 3248, ANTHR 3248, ANTHR 6248, ARKEO 3248, ARKEO 6248 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a long-term overview of the indigenous peoples of Cornell's home region and their neighbors from an archaeological perspective.  Cornell students live and work in the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, or Six Nations Iroquois, and this class will help residents to understand the deep history of this place. We will examine long-term changes in material culture, settlement, subsistence, and trade; the founding of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy; indigenous responses to European and American colonization; the practicalities of doing indigenous-site archaeology in New York State; and contemporary indigenous perspectives on archaeology. Visits to local archaeological sites and museum collections will supplement classroom instruction.
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AMST 6272 : Archaeology of Colonialism and Cultural Entanglement
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4720, AIIS 7720, AMST 4272, ANTHR 4272, ANTHR 7272, ARKEO 4272, ARKEO 7272 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar uses archaeology to examine engagements between settlers and indigenous peoples throughout world history. Archaeology provides a perspective on settler-indigenous encounters that both supplements and challenges conventional models.  We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of cultural engagement, examine methodologies, and explore a series of archaeological case studies, using examples from both the ancient world and the European expansion over the past 600 years. The seminar provides a comparative perspective on indigenous-colonial relationships, in particular exploring the hard-fought spaces of relative autonomy created and sustained by indigenous peoples. 
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AMST 6322 : Readings in 20th Century African-American History
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6322, HIST 6322 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This graduate seminar will explore major currents in historical writing about African-American life and culture in the twentieth century. Focusing on social, intellectual, and labor history, we will identify key themes in recent studies of the formation of modern black communities and politics before and after World War Two. The course will place special emphasis on class, gender, social movements, and migration.
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AMST 6531 : The History of Capitalism: The US Case in Perspective
Crosslisted as: HIST 6531 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course takes a theoretical (what are some of the key understandings of capitalism?), methodological (how should we study it?), and case study approach to the history of capitalism in the United States and beyond. The History of Capitalism has become a major research field in the last decade and in this course we will examine the new historiography, as well as the older scholarship (Polanyi, Braudel, and other works) on which it is built.  While the main focus will be on the history of the United States, we will examine this development comparatively and in the context of the rich literature in other parts of the world. We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of the history of capitalism approach to analyzing and understanding American history. Along the way we will examine how it relates to other topics such as the history of slavery and work, consumerism and identity, neoliberalism and political economy, and intellectual and cultural history.  Students in other departments and history graduate students who are not specialists in US history are encouraged to take this course.
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AMST 6627 : Disobedience, Resistance, Refusal
Crosslisted as: AMST 4626, GOVT 4626, PHIL 4427, PHIL 6427, SHUM 4627, SHUM 6627 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
AMST 6733 : The Future of Whiteness
Crosslisted as: AMST 4733, ASRC 4733, ENGL 4733, ENGL 6733 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How should decent, anti-racist people respond to the racialized white identities that have emerged recently in Europe and the United States?  What alternative conceptions of whiteness are available? Or should whiteness be rejected altogether? How can we form cross-racial progressive coalitions? How should we understand the nature of our social identities and what they make possible?  This course is a wide-ranging introduction to these questions with readings from writers such as Rudyard Kipling, William Faulkner, E. M. Forster, Toni Morrison and Dorothy Allison, as well as relevant anthropological and social-theoretical work (on racial identities, whiteness studies, etc.) and memoirs by, for example, former KKK members.  A central text will be the new book The Future of Whiteness by the Latina feminist philosopher Linda Martin Alcoff.
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AMST 6819 : Urban Representation
Crosslisted as: ARCH 6408, ENGL 6919, LSP 6819, SHUM 6819 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Urban Representation Labs are intended to bring students and faculty into direct contact with complex urban representations spanning a wide media spectrum and evoking a broad set of humanist discourses. Students will leverage archival materials at Cornell to launch new observations and explore unanticipated approaches to urban culture that derive from previously understudied archival materials. The goal is twofold: to demystify the representational technologies involved in presenting the city, and to unpack the political, cultural, and aesthetic values and priorities embedded in every form of presentation. Urban Representation Labs are offered under the auspices of Cornell University's Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Collaborative Studies in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities grant. For current special topic seminar description and application instructions, visit: urbanismeseminars.cornell.edu/courses/.
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