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AMST 1101 : Introduction to American Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Noliwe Rooks
This course is an introduction to interdisciplinary considerations of American culture. Specific topics may change from year to year and may include questions of national consensus versus native, immigrant and racial subcultures and countercultures; industrialization and the struggles over labor; the rise of leisure; the transformation of (the frequently gendered) public and private spheres; the relationship between politics and culture; the development and distinctions among consumer culture, mass culture and popular culture. These themes will be examined through a variety of media, such as literature, historical writing, music, art, film, architecture, etc. The course will also give attention to the many methods through which scholars have, over time, developed the discipline of American Studies.
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AMST 1115 : Introduction to American Government and Politics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 1111 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Douglas Kriner
A policy-centered approach to the study of government in the American experience.  Considers the American Founding and how it influenced the structure of government;  how national institutions operate in shaping law and public policy; who has a voice in American politics and why some are more influential than others; and how existing public policies themselves influence social, economic, and political power.  Students will gain an introductory knowledge of the founding principles and structure of American government, political institutions, political processes, political behavior, and public policy.
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AMST 1149 : FWS: The Third World Within: Poverty and Paradox in the U.S.
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Eleanor Andrews
The United States is supposed to exemplify the First World and the global North. But poverty, colonialism, and marginalization are everywhere, evident in income inequality, environmental injustices, gun violence, high rates of incarceration, and more. Together, we will examine these problems, asking whether they stand apart from modern development or are a hidden but integral part of it. For example, how does the pipeline running through the Standing Rock Indian Reservation compare to energy extraction in other parts of the world? What does the continued crisis in Puerto Rico say about 21st-century colonialism? Over the course of the semester, students will produce a sociological research proposal, articulating realistic, data-driven research questions about the paradoxes that surround us.
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AMST 1290 : American Society through Film
Crosslisted as: SOC 1290 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Strang
Introduces students to the sociological analysis of American society through the lens of film. Major themes involve race, class, and gender; upward and downward mobility; incorporation and exclusion; small town vs the big city; and cultural conflicts over individualism, achievement, and community. We match a range of movies like American Graffiti (Lucas), Ace in the Hole (Wilder), The Asphalt Jungle (Houston), Do the Right Thing (Lee), The Heiress (Wyler), High Noon (Zinnemann), Mean Streets (Scorsese), Nashville (Altman), The Philadelphia Story (Cukor), and A Streetcar Named Desire (Kazan). Each film is paired with social scientific research that examines parallel topics, such as analyses of who goes to college, the production of news, deviant careers, urban riots, the gendered presentation of self, and the prisoner's dilemma.
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AMST 1312 : History of Rock Music
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 1312 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Judith Peraino
This course examines the development and cultural significance of rock music from its origins in blues, gospel, and Tin Pan Alley up to alternative rock and hip hop. The course concludes with the year 2000.
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AMST 1321 : Music of Mexico and the Mexican Diaspora
Crosslisted as: LATA 1321, LSP 1321, MUSIC 1321, SPAN 1321 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Alejandro Madrid
This class is a survey of music practices among Mexican communities both in Mexico and in the U.S. Taking contemporary musical practices as a point of departure, the class explores the historical, cultural, and political significance of a wide variety of Mexican music traditions (including indigenous, folk, popular, and art music, dating back to the 16th Century) from a transnational perspective.
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AMST 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1500, GOVT 1503 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
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AMST 1500 : Introduction to Africana Studies
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1500, GOVT 1503 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Siba Grovogui
This course offers an introduction to the study of Africa, the U.S., the Caribbean and other diasporas.  This course will examine, through a range of disciplines, among them literature, history, politics, philosophy, the themes - including race/racism, the Middle Passage, sexuality, colonialism, and culture - that have dominated Africana Studies since its inception in the late-1960s. We will explore these issues in the attempt to understand how black lives have been shaped, in a historical sense; and, of course, the effects of these issues in the contemporary moment. This course seeks to introduce these themes, to investigate through one or more of the disciplines relevant to the question, and to provide a broad understanding of the themes so as to enable the kind of intellectual reflection critical to Africana Studies.
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AMST 1540 : American Capitalism
Crosslisted as: HIST 1540, ILRLR 1845 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kim Todt
This course studies the history of American capitalism. It helps you to answer these questions: What is capitalism? Is the U.S. more capitalist than other countries? How has capitalism shaped the history of the United States? Has it been a force for freedom, or is it a system of exploitation? What is its future? Through lectures, readings, and discussions, we'll give you the tools to win all your future arguments about capitalism, pro and con. And we won't even charge you the full market price.
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AMST 1585 : Sports and Politics in American History
Crosslisted as: HIST 1585 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lawrence Glickman
This course will explore the relationship between sports and politics over the course of American history since the 19th century.  Sports and politics have come together surprisingly frequently in the last two centuries and this course will take a "case study" method to examine particular episodes of politicized sports.  In the course of our investigations, we will the following questions: How do we define politics?  How have sports acted as a place for subversion and resistance? Conversely, how have sports reflected the power structure? No background knowledge is necessary.   Course materials will include memoirs, articles, and a variety of visual sources, including film and photography.   Course requirements will include a research paper.
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AMST 1595 : African American History From 1865
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1595, HIST 1595 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Russell Rickford
Focusing on political and social history, this course surveys African-American history from Emancipation to the present. The class examines the post-Reconstruction "Nadir" of black life; the mass black insurgency against structural racism before and after World War II; and the Post-Reform Age that arose in the wake of the dismantling of legal segregation. The course will familiarize students with the basic themes of African-American life and experience and equip them to grasp concepts of political economy; class formation; and the intersection of race, class and gender.
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AMST 1600 : Indigenous North America
Crosslisted as: AIIS 1100, ANTHR 1700 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kurt Jordan
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the diverse cultures, histories and contemporary situations of the Indigenous peoples of North America. Students will also be introduced to important themes in the post-1492 engagement between Indigenous and settler populations in North America and will consider the various and complex ways in which that history affected - and continues to affect - American Indian peoples and societies. Course materials draw on the humanities, social sciences, and expressive arts.
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AMST 1601 : Indigenous Issues in Global Perspectives
Crosslisted as: AIIS 1110 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Karim-Aly Kassam
This course attends to the contemporary issues, contexts and experiences of Indigenous peoples. Students will develop a substantive understanding of colonialism and engage in the parallels and differences of its histories, forms, and effects on Indigenous peoples globally.  Contemporary Indigenous theorists, novelists, visual artists and historians have a prominent place in the course, highlighting social/environmental philosophies, critical responses to and forms of resistance toward neocolonial political and economic agendas and the fundamental concern for Indigenous self determination, among other topics.
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AMST 1640 : U.S. History since the Great Depression
Crosslisted as: HIST 1640 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Julilly Kohler-Hausmann
An introductory survey to United States history since the Great Depression, this course explores the dramatic social, economic, and political transformations of the last century. It emphasizes domestic political developments, particularly the evolving notions of government responsibility for various social problems. Therefore, the course is especially concerned with the interactions between the state, popular movements, and people's daily lives.
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AMST 1802 : Introduction to Latinos in U.S. History
Crosslisted as: HIST 1802, LATA 1802, LSP 1802 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Maria Cristina Garcia
This course seeks a fuller recounting of U.S. history by remapping what we understand as "America." We will examine traditional themes in the teaching of U.S. history—territorial expansion and empire, migration and nation building, industrialization and labor, war and revolution, and citizenship and transnationalism—but we will examine this "American experience" in a broader hemispheric context and include as actors americanos of Spanish, Mexican, Caribbean, and Central/South American ancestries.
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AMST 2000 : Introduction to Visual Studies
Crosslisted as: ARTH 2000, COML 2000, VISST 2000 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Moisey
This course introduces the field of Visual Studies.  Visual Studies seeks to define and improve our visual relationship to nature and culture after the modern surge in technology and knowledge.  It contains objects, images, and problems that lie beyond the Art History and experimental science, yet is grown from both cultures.  It teaches the physical and legal limits of human, animal, and machine vision, how knowledge and power get into images, how spectacle drives the economy, and techniques of analysis that can deliver fresh perspectives across disciplines.
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AMST 2001 : The First American University
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2999, HIST 2005 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Corey Earle
Shirley Samuels
Educational historian Frederick Rudolph called Cornell University "the first American university," referring to its unique role as a coeducational, nonsectarian, land-grant institution with a broad curriculum and diverse student body. In this course, we will explore the history of Cornell, taking as our focus the pledge of Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White to found a university where "any person can find instruction in any study." The course will cover a wide range of topics and perspectives relating to the faculty, student body, evolution of campus, and important events and eras in Cornell history. Stories and vignettes will provide background on the current university and its administrative structure, campus traditions, and the names that adorn buildings and memorials throughout campus. Finally, the course will offer a forum for students to address questions on present-day aspects of the university.
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AMST 2070 : Social Problems in the United States
Crosslisted as: PAM 2250, SOC 2070 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Peter Rich
This course introduces the causes, consequences, and possible solutions of major issues facing U.S. society today. Students learn how social problems are defined and contested in the public sphere, and how various perspectives reflect underlying debates about social norms and values. Through readings, lectures, in-class discussion, and writing assignments, students explore a range of social problems in depth, such as: childhood poverty, racial segregation and discrimination, crime, job insecurity, family instability, discrimination by sexual identity, unequal pay for women's work, and gender imbalances in family life. Students study the historical and social roots of these various issues, bringing into focus how individual experiences and choices are embedded within a broader social structure.
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AMST 2108 : Indigenous Ingenuities as Living Networks
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2100, ARTH 2101 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jolene Rickard
This course explores Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) knowledge and its application across the disciplines and through time. In particular, it offers a glimpse into Cornell's local indigenous culture through Haudenosaunee understanding of themselves as a unique people, maintaining traditional teachings and fulfilling ancient responsibilities in the world. Students will engage multiple primary sources including: art, archives, material and expressive culture and interact with Haudenosaunee knowledge holders, intellectuals, and elders.
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AMST 2112 : Black Spirituality, Religion & Protest
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2112, HIST 2112, RELST 2112 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course examines Black spirituality, religion, and protest from an historical perspective, beginning with African traditions and Christianity during enslavement, which created resistance ideology and racial nationalism. Prophetic Christianity and church formation became primary political weapons after enslavement, particularly in the Age of Jim Crow, and foundationally led to twentieth century civil rights movements. While exploring these themes, the course will also analyze the complexities and contractions (i.e. Southern Baptist Convention, Nation of Islam and Black Lives Matter) inherent in resistance movements based on spiritual leadership.
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AMST 2152 : (Im)migration and (Im)migrants: Then and Now
Crosslisted as: GOVT 2152, LSP 2152 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sergio Garcia-Rios
One in ten residents of the United States was born outside the country. These people include international students, temporary workers, refugees, asylees, permanent residents, naturalized U.S. citizens and undocumented migrants. The arrival of these newcomers affects the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics of the country. Since immigration shows no signs of slowing down—in the United States or in many other nations of the world—the causes, consequences and repercussions of immigration will be one of the most important topics of the 21- century. Therefore this class will examine the history and contemporary role of immigration in the U.S. political system. The class will focus on two aspects of immigration: First, a historical examination of immigration policy from the founding of the country all the way forward to the current debate over immigration reform. Second, we will evaluate and assess the political incorporation and political participation of immigrant groups in the U.S. and determine whether immigrants are being incorporated, and if not, why? We will reflect on many important questions including the costs and benefits of immigration, issues related to civil rights and civil liberties, and finally propose our own ideas and solutions to the current immigration reform debate.
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AMST 2220 : From the New Deal to the Age of Reagan
Crosslisted as: HIST 2220 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lawrence Glickman
This seminar will explore some of the major political and cultural trends in the United States,  from the era of the Democratic New Dealer, Franklin D. Roosevelt, through the era of the conservative Republican, Ronald Reagan? This seminar will explore through primary source research and secondary readings  the key economic, political, and cultural characteristics and transformations of the period from 1930 though the turn of the century.  The course will examine the rise, persistence, and breakdown of the so-called "New Deal Order" and the crucial political shifts that we call the "Reagan Revolution." A key theme in this course will be the transformations and critiques of American liberalism and conservatism.
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AMST 2225 : Controversies About Inequality
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2220, GOVT 2225, ILROB 2220, PAM 2220, PHIL 1950, SOC 2220 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Cristobal Young
In recent years, poverty and inequality have become increasingly common topics of public debate, as academics, journalists, and politicians attempt to come to terms with growing income inequality, with the increasing visibility of inter-country differences in wealth and income, and with the persistence of racial, ethnic, and gender stratification. This course introduces students to ongoing social scientific debates about the sources and consequences of inequality, as well as the types of public policy that might appropriately be pursued to reduce (or increase) inequality. These topics will be addressed in related units, some of which include guest lectures by faculty from other universities (funded by the Center for the Study of Inequality). Each unit culminates with a highly spirited class discussion and debate.
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AMST 2274 : The Manson Murders
Crosslisted as: HIST 2274 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Claudia Verhoeven
On August 9-10, 1969, ex-convict, aspiring rock star, and charismatic leader Charles Manson ordered his so-called Family to brutally murder a few of LA's rich, white, "beautiful people" and leave clues implicating black radicals. The idea was to trigger an apocalyptic race war he called "Helter Skelter" (after a song by The Beatles). Today, these murders stand as the most infamous in twentieth-century U.S. criminal history and as synecdoche for the "end of the Sixties." They have also spawned a veritable Manson Industry in the popular realm: there are now Manson books, movies, TV shows, documentaries, podcasts, websites, music, comics, t-shirts, and even a tourist attraction (the Hollywood "Helter Skelter" tour).  The seminar will analyze the history of the Manson murders as well as their incredible resonance in American culture over the past half century. Who was Charles Manson and who were the members of the Family? What was the Family's relation to the counterculture, to Hollywood, Vietnam, the Black Panther Party, and environmentalism? How might we fit the Manson murders into the long history of apocalyptic violence and terror? And what does it mean that the Manson murders have occupied our collective imagination for fifty years? To answer these and other questions, we will analyze a variety of sources including television and newspaper reports, trial transcripts, true crime writing, memoirs, interviews, novels, films and documentaries, podcasts and pop songs.
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AMST 2296 : History Lab: Digital History of Black Resistance
Crosslisted as: HIST 2296 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Edward Baptist
This course will study African-American resistance to slavery over 250 years, focusing in particular on runaways, fugitives, and other self-liberating people. As a "history lab," we will work with original sources in digital form, and in the process will learn about digital presentation and analysis in the humanities. We will read and discuss texts by historians, with an eye towards enhancing students' abilities to understand, critique, and build from such texts.  But the class will also work closely with the database of "runaway slave" advertisements at freedomonthemove.org, a major digital-history project based at Cornell.  They will not only learn how such projects work as history of Black resistance, they will learn about digital humanities projects. They will learn how assess and critique such projects' contribution to history, and contribute to the development of the project as a digital humanities project.  Ability to code is not required.
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AMST 2320 : Latino Music in the US
Crosslisted as: LSP 2320, MUSIC 2320 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Alejandro Madrid
Music and dance cultures have been central topics of study in the development of Chicano studies, Puerto Rican studies, and Latino studies in general. From Americo Paredes to Frances Aparicio and from Jose Limon to Deborah Pacini-Hernandez, focusing on music and embodied culture through sound has allowed scholars to engage the wide variety of cultural experiences of the different ethnic groups usually described with the term "Latino." Taking this scholarship as a point of departure, this class offers a survey of Latino music in the U.S. as a window into the political, cultural and social that struggles Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Brazilians, Colombians, and Central Americans have gone through while becoming hyphenated (Eg. Mexican-American, Cuban American, etc) or not, and into how these processes have continually challenged and enriched mainstream notions of "American identity."
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AMST 2340 : The Beatles
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 2340 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Judith Peraino
The course will focus on the music of the Beatles and their impact on American and British culture in the 1960s to the present day. Topics include considerations of race, gender, class, sexuality, and the media in their rise to fame; the influence of the counter-culture, drugs, and other rock musicians, as well as Western and Indian classical music on their music and image; their perceived rivalry with the Rolling Stones; and their experimentation with recording technology
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AMST 2391 : From Terra Incognita to Territories of Nation-States: Early American History in Two Dozen Maps
Crosslisted as: HIST 2391 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jon Parmenter
This course engages the rich cartographic record of colonial North America via an in-depth analysis of two dozen iconic maps.  Integrating visual and textual analysis, students will assess human representations of space across cultural boundaries, explore change over time in the mapmaking practices of indigenous peoples and various European intruders, and study the evolving relationship between cartography and power, attending particularly to the process by which mapping promoted a revolutionary new understanding of American geography as composed of the bounded territories of nation-states.
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AMST 2401 : Introduction to Latino/a Literature
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2400, LSP 2400 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Mary Pat Brady
From the radical manifestos of revolutionaries to the satirical plays of union organizers, from new, experimental novels to poetry, visual art, and music, this course examines Latino/a literature published in the United States beginning in the early nineteenth century and continuing to the present. We will pay particular attention to the historical, theoretical, and literary context for this literature. We will study memoir, poetry, essays, and cultural production. Authors include José Martí, Luisa Capetillo, Israel 'Cachao' López, Josefina López, Cherríe Moraga, Esmerelda Santiago, Gloria Anzaldúa, José Montoya, Carmen Tafolla, and Pedro Pietri.
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AMST 2405 : The Italian-American Experience
Crosslisted as: ITAL 2400 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Valentina Fulginiti
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AMST 2423 : Dazed and Confused: The Politics of Drug and Alcohol in US History
Crosslisted as: HIST 2423 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Julilly Kohler-Hausmann
How did some intoxicating substances come to be illegal, while others are socially accepted? What is the role and responsibility of the state in managing the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol? This seminar examines the history of the nation's efforts to control and regulate intoxicants, with special attention given to why specific substances are criminalized and decriminalized at various points in history. It will focus on the relationship between social, economic, and political upheaval and campaigns to crack down on drugs. The course also investigates the growing trend to approach some drug and alcohol abuse as a medical problem and the rise of self-help societies and substance abuse rehabilitation. For example, we will examine state responses to opium use by middle class white women and Chinese immigrants during the 19th century, the passage and repeal of Prohibition, and the contemporary "War on Drugs."
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AMST 2470 : Digital Latinxs
Crosslisted as: LSP 2470, STS 2470 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ivan Chaar Lopez
Digital technology has been a part of modern life in the U.S. since the Cold War. A growing population of users works, plays, become politically active and fight-off boredom through digital technology. But who are these users? Where do they congregate and how do they emerge? How do they make meaning of their lives? This course focuses on the everyday experiences of Latinxs as users. It examines their participation in digital environments and their engagements with technology while paying attention to their social, political, and cultural contexts. Rather than imagine "users" as a universal category, students will learn about the experiences of Latinxs in digital spaces and their contributions to what scholars call digital culture.
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AMST 2470 : Digital Latinxs
Crosslisted as: LSP 2470, STS 2470 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ivan Chaar Lopez
Digital technology has been a part of modern life in the U.S. since the Cold War. A growing population of users works, plays, become politically active and fight-off boredom through digital technology. But who are these users? Where do they congregate and how do they emerge? How do they make meaning of their lives? This course focuses on the everyday experiences of Latinxs as users. It examines their participation in digital environments and their engagements with technology while paying attention to their social, political, and cultural contexts. Rather than imagine "users" as a universal category, students will learn about the experiences of Latinxs in digital spaces and their contributions to what scholars call digital culture.
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AMST 2512 : Black Women in the 20th Century
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2512, FGSS 2512, HIST 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course focuses on African American women in the 20th century. The experiences of black women will be examined from a social, practical, communal, and gendered perspective. Topics include the Club Woman's movement, suffrage, work, family, black and white women and feminism, black women and radicalism, and the feminization of poverty.
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AMST 2577 : American Jewish Women and the Body of Tradition
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor: Description
AMST 2600 : Introduction to Native American Literature
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2600, ENGL 2600 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Eric Cheyfitz
For description, see ENGL 2600.
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AMST 2620 : Introduction to Asian American Literature
Crosslisted as: AAS 2620, ENGL 2620 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sunn Wong
This course will introduce both a variety of writings by Asian North American authors and some critical issues concerning the production and reception of Asian American texts. Working primarily with novels, we will be asking questions about the relation between literary forms and the socio-historical context within which they take on their meanings, and about the historical formation of Asian American identities.
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AMST 2622 : Introduction to Asian American Performance
Crosslisted as: AAS 2623, PMA 2621 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christine Balance
An introduction to Asian American performance, this course will consider both historical and contemporary examples and forms through the analytics of Asian American studies, theatre studies, and performance studies. Throughout the semester, we will pay equal attention to various forms of performance — plays and other staged performances, performance art, as well as everyday performances — as well as both primary sources and theoretical/critical readings. Students will be introduced to key concepts of Asian American performance studies, such as Orientalism, yellow face, radicalized accents, and the performing body, and will begin to not only map a history of Asian American performance but also situate contemporary examples within this tradition.
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AMST 2640 : Introduction to Asian American History
Crosslisted as: AAS 2130, HIST 2640 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Derek Chang
An introductory history of Chinese, Japanese, Asian Indians, Filipinos, and Koreans in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1990s. Major themes include racism and resistance, labor migration, community formation, imperialism, and struggles for equality.
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AMST 2645 : Race and Modern US History
Crosslisted as: AAS 2641, ASRC 2631, HIST 2641 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Derek Chang
This course surveys modern U.S. history, from Reconstruction to the contemporary period. It will examine how race has been the terrain on which competing ideas of the American nation have been contested. From struggles over citizenship rights to broader meanings of national belonging, we will explore how practices, ideas, and representations have shaped political, cultural, and social power. A key concern for this course is examining how groups and individuals have pursued racial justice from the late-nineteenth century to the present.
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AMST 2655 : Latinos in the United States
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2650, LSP 2010, SOC 2650 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Hector Velez
Exploration and analysis of the Hispanic experience in the United States. Examines the sociohistorical background and economic, psychological, and political factors that converge to shape a Latino group identity in the United States. Perspectives are suggested and developed for understanding Hispanic migrations, the plight of Latinos in urban and rural areas, and the unique problems faced by the diverse Latino groups. Groups studied include Mexican Americans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans.
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AMST 2660 : Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong: Unlearning Native American History
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2660, HIST 2660 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jon Parmenter
One thing many Americans think they know is their Indians: Pocahontas, the First Thanksgiving, fighting cowboys, reservation poverty, and casino riches. Under our very noses, however, Native American history has evolved into one of the most exciting, dynamic, and contentious fields of inquiry into America's past. It is now safer to assume, as Comanche historian Paul Chaat Smith has pointed out, that everything you know about Indians is in fact wrong. Most people have much to "unlearn" about Native American history before true learning can take place. This course aims to achieve that end by (re)introducing students to key themes and trends in the history of North America's indigenous nations. Employing an issues-oriented approach, the course stresses the ongoing complexity of Native American societies' engagements with varieties of settler colonialism since 1492 and dedicates itself to a concerted program of myth-busting. As such, the course will provide numerous opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking and reading skills.
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AMST 2665 : The American Revolutionary Era
Crosslisted as: HIST 2665 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jon Parmenter
As we approach the 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, this course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the origins, character, and results of the American Revolution, as well as engaging the enduring significance of its memory in contemporary American life - why do we choose to remember the American Revolution in ways that occlude its divisive and bloody events? This course explores many of the key themes of this critical period of American history: the rise of colonial opposition to Great Britain, the nature of the Revolutionary Wars, and the domestic "republican experiment" that followed the Treaty of Paris in 1783. The course emphasizes student interpretations with an eye toward analyzing the comparative experiences of women and men, "everyday people" and famous leaders, Native Americans, African-Americans, and those who opposed the Revolution.
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AMST 2725 : Introduction to Latina/o/x Performance
Crosslisted as: LSP 2720, PMA 2720 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Karen Jaime
This course is an introduction to Latina/o/x Performance investigating the historical and contemporary representations of Latina/o/xs in performance and media. Throughout the semester, students will critically examine central themes and issues that inform the experiences and (re) presentations of Latina/o/xs in the United States. How is latinidad performed? In situating the class around "Latina/o/x," as both an umbrella term and an enacted social construction, we will then turn our attention to (re) presentations of latinidad within different genres of cultural expressions.
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AMST 2817 : America Confronts the World
Crosslisted as: GOVT 2817 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Peter Katzenstein
Donald Trump and Barack Obama give us two visions of America and of the world: xenophobic nationalism and pragmatic cosmopolitanism.  America and the world are thus constituted by great diversity. The first half of the course seeks to understand that diversity in American politics and foreign policy viewed through the prisms of region, ideology, region, race, class and religion. The second half inquires into the U.S. and American engagement of different world regions and civilizations: Europe, Russia, North America, Latin America, China, Japan, India and the Middle East. U.S. hard power and American soft power find expression in far-reaching processes of American-infused globalization and U.S.-centered anti-Americanism reverberating around the world. Advocates of one-size-fits-all solutions to America's and the world's variegated politics are in for great disappointments.
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AMST 2841 : Viruses- Humans-Viral Politics (Social History and Cultural Politics of HIV & AIDS)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2021, BSOC 2841, FGSS 2841, LGBT 2841, STS 2841 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Christopher Roebuck
This course explores what has been termed "the modern plague."  It investigates the social history, cultural politics, biological processes, and global impacts of the retrovirus, HIV, and the disease syndrome, AIDS. It engages material from multiple fields: life sciences, social sciences, & humanities as well as media reports, government documents, activist art, and community-based documentaries. It explores various meanings and life-experiences of HIV & AIDS; examines conflicting understandings of health, disease, the body; investigates political struggles over scientific research, biomedical & public health interventions, and cultural representations; and queries how HIV vulnerability is shaped by systems of power and inequality. As well, we come to learn about the practices, the politics, and the ethics of life and care that arise in "the age of epidemic."
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AMST 2910 : It's All Chinese to Me
Crosslisted as: AAS 2910, ENGL 2910 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Sunn Wong
In her memoir Woman Warrior, Maxine Hong Kingston identified a conundrum familiar to many US-born children of Chinese immigrants when she asked: "What is Chinese tradition and what is the movies?" What is "Chinese tradition"? Does it mean the same thing to people in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore, or to Chinese diasporic communities in North America?  Does "Chineseness" change across time and space? While there will be occasion to discuss what "Chineseness" means in different Asian contexts, this course will focus primarily on how ideas of "China" and "Chineseness" have been historically constructed by, for, and in the West—particularly in the US. Course materials include readings on the concept of "Chineseness," Chinese American literature and film, and historical studies of East/West relations.
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AMST 2955 : Socialism in America
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2955, HIST 2955 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Russell Rickford
"Why no socialism in America?" Scholars and activists have long pondered the relative dearth (compared to other industrialized societies) of sustained, popular, anticapitalist activity in the United States. Sure, leftist movements in the U.S. have often looked and operated differently than those in other parts of the world. But many Americans have forged creative and vibrant traditions of anticapitalism under very difficult circumstances. This class examines socialist thought and practice in the U.S. from the 19th century to the present. We trace intersections of race, class, and gender while exploring the freedom dreams of those who have opposed capitalism in the very heart of global power.
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AMST 2980 : Inventing an Information Society
Crosslisted as: ECE 2980, ENGRG 2980, HIST 2920, INFO 2921, STS 2921 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ronald Kline
Explores the history of information technology from the 1830s to the present by considering the technical and social history of telecommunications (telegraph and the telephone), radio, television, computers, and the Internet. Emphasis is on the changing relationship between science and technology, the economic aspects of innovation, gender and technology, and other social relations of this technology.
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AMST 3010 : Photography and the American Dream
Crosslisted as: ART 3810, ARTH 3010, VISST 3010 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Bill Gaskins
Who are 'the poor' in the United States? Who are the largest recipients of federal welfare and entitlement spending? Why is there an unprecedented simultaneous increase in wealth and poverty in the United States at this point in its history? What role does photography play in our understanding and misunderstanding of poverty in 'the greatest country in the world?' In this course we will explore the perceptions of poverty in the United States through three major American newspapers.
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AMST 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3020, ASRC 3020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Oneka LaBennett
Hip Hop/Hipster/Immigrant/Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn and deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
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AMST 3020 : Representing Brooklyn: Race, Place and Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3020, ASRC 3020 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Oneka LaBennett
Hip Hop/Hipster/Immigrant/Brownstone Brooklyn. This course borrows from hip hop's notion of "representing" to explore popular and cultural understandings of race and place in Brooklyn as depicted in print, music, film, and online. While today Brooklyn is New York City's hippest borough and the site of swift gentrification, booming real estate, and the ever-escalating displacement of immigrant and Black communities, in the 1980s and 1990s it was a hotbed of hip hop music, making the borough synonymous with Black cultural production. The course examines Black cultural production as it relates to representations of Brooklyn and deconstructs images and discourses that marginalize the borough's Black residents. Spanning the period from 1945 to the present day, the commodification of hip hop in the 1980s-1990s, and close readings of films including Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing," to reflect on how Black popular culture engages with Brooklyn's diverse communities. While materials are interdisciplinary in approach, our investigation is informed by anthropological, historical, and literary texts covering topics including immigration, youth culture, transnationalism, gentrification, authenticity, and classed, gendered and racialized inequality.
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AMST 3025 : Asian Americans & Popular Culture
Crosslisted as: AAS 3020, PMA 3420 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christine Balance
This course examines both mainstream representations of and independent media made by, for, and about Asians and Asian Americans throughout U.S. cultural history. In this course, we will analyze popular cultural genres & forms such as: documentary & narrative films, musical theatre & live performance revues, television, zines & blogs, YouTube/online performances, karaoke & cover performances, stand-up comedy, and popular music. Employing theories of cultural studies, media studies, and performance studies, we will discuss the cultural, discursive, and political impact of these various popular cultural forms and representations from the turn of the 20th century to the present.
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AMST 3032 : Race and Revolution in the Americas: 1776-1900
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3031, HIST 3031, LATA 3031 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course will examine the "age of democratic revolutions" in the Americas from the perspective of the Black Atlantic. During this momentous era, when European monarchies were successfully challenged and constitutional governments created, Blacks fomented their own American revolutions both in the outside of evolving "New World democracies." This course examines the black trajectory in British North America, Latin America, the French (especially Haiti,) the British and the Spanish Caribbean. The course begins with black participation in the U.S. independence War (1776-1781) and concludes with black (non-U.S.) participation in the independence wars against Spain. The course will also briefly address post-emancipation race relations in these American countries. 
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AMST 3033 : Politics of Public Policy in the U.S.
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3032 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jamila Michener
Public policies are political outcomes determined by processes that are complex, convoluted and often controversial. The aim of this course is to equip students with the conceptual tools necessary to understand these processes. We will begin with a review of popular approaches to studying policy and then move on to explore the various stages of policy development: agenda-setting, policy design, policy implementation, policy feedback and policy change. We will consider the roles played by both institutions (congress, the bureaucracy and interests groups) and everyday people. Finally, we will closely study several specific policy arenas (a few likely candidates include: education policy, health policy, social welfare policy and housing policy). As we engage all of these ideas, students will be consistently challenged to grapple with the paradoxes of policy making in a democratic polity and to envision pathways for substantive political change.  
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AMST 3071 : Enduring Global and American Issues
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3071 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Silbey
The US and the global community face a number of complex, interconnected and enduring issues that pose challenges for our political and policy governance institutions and society at large.  Exploring how the US and the world conceive of the challenges and take action on them is fundamental to understanding them.  This course investigates such issues, especially ones that fit into the critically important areas of sustainability, social justice, technology, public health and globalization, security and conflict, among others. Students will engage with these areas and issues and the challenges they pose, using multiple frameworks and approaches, through weekly class discussions and lectures."
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AMST 3082 : American Political Campaigns
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3082 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Adam Levine
This course focuses on political campaigns, a central feature of American democracy. We will examine how they work and the conditions under which they affect citizens' decisions. The course looks at campaign strategies and attributes of candidates, as well as how and whether they affect key outcomes such as the decision to turn out, who to vote for, and whether to spend money and volunteer time helping favored candidates win.
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AMST 3121 : Crime and Punishment
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3121 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Joseph Margulies
This is a class about the American criminal justice system—from policing to prisons, from arrest to reentry.  In many ways, the operation of the modern criminal justice system is taken for granted, which frequently allows it to escape close scrutiny. But we will examine it in great detail, with a focus on how it came about, how it sustains itself, its many roles in society (only some of which involve crime and justice), and how and why it may be changing.  NB:  This class is designed to challenge your settled assumptions and dearly held myths about what is right and wrong with the system.  Those who have made up their mind about criminal justice in America should not take the course.  This class was formerly GOVT 3141, PRISONS, taught by Prof. Margulies.  It has been renamed and renumbered as GOVT 3121 to distinguish it from the distance learning course taught by Prof. Katzenstein.
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AMST 3131 : The Nature, Functions, and Limits of Law
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3131, LAW 4131 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Dawn Chutkow
A general-education course to acquaint students with how our legal system pursues the goals of society. The course introduces students to various perspectives on the nature of law, what functions it ought to serve in society, and what it can and cannot accomplish. The course proceeds in the belief that such matters constitute a valuable and necessary part of a general education, not only for pre-law students but especially for students in other fields. Assigned readings comprise legal materials and also secondary sources on the legal process and the role of law in society. The classes include discussion and debate about current legal and social issues, including equality, safety, the environment, punishment, and autonomy.
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AMST 3142 : Incarceration, Policy Response, and Self-Reflection
Crosslisted as: EDUC 3143, GOVT 3142 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Maria Reed
This class is intended to provoke some hard thinking about the relationship of committed "outsiders" and advocates of change to the experience of crime, punishment, and incarceration and to the men we meet at Auburn/Cayuga who have been in most instances long-confined to prison. We will read, think, talk and write about the incarceration experience and about policies that shape this experience. We will also think self-reflexively about the character of the 'outsider's' educational, political, and personal engagement. What are the motivations and what are the goals of such engagement? What are the anticipated outcomes – personal, social, educational, political, and/or moral and perhaps spiritual? In an effort to delve deeply into these questions, we will read a broad selection of work on incarceration, itself, as well as on the experience of what has come to be termed service learning or civic engagement. (AM)  
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AMST 3155 : Prisons, Politics & Policy
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3152 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jamila Michener
Prisons are social and political institutions governed by local, state and national policies. They have a profound influence on American society, especially on our political community.  They amplify inequality and disadvantage. The massive number of people imprisoned in the United States speaks volumes about our policy priorities and about our democracy. How did things get this way? How did we end up being the nation that incarcerates more of its population than virtually any other? What policy processes directly and indirectly account for this? What explains the change that we now appear to be experiencing? What is the future of the U.S. prison system? What is the future of our democracy? This course will tackle these and other pressing questions. Students will gain an empirically grounded and theoretically far-reaching understanding of one of the most fundamental and transformative institutions in America.
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AMST 3161 : The American Presidency
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3161 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Douglas Kriner
This course will explore and seek explanations for the performance of the 20-21st century presidency, focusing on its institutional and political development, recruitment process (nominations and elections), relationships to social groups, economic forces, and "political time."  We will also analyze the parameters of foreign & domestic policy making.
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AMST 3230 : American Economic History I
Crosslisted as: ECON 3310 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Thomas Lyons
Surveys problems in American economic history from the first settlements to early industrialization.
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AMST 3281 : Constitutional Politics: The U.S. Supreme Court
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3281, LAW 3281 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Dawn Chutkow
This course investigates the United States Supreme Court and its role in politics and government. It traces the development of constitutional doctrine, the growth of the Court's institutional power, and the Court's interaction with Congress, the president, and society. Discussed are major constitutional law decisions, their political contexts, and the social and behavioral factors that affect judges, justices, and federal court jurisprudence.
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AMST 3321 : Jazz Around the World
Crosslisted as: MUSIC 3321 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sergio Ospina Romero
This course explores the history of the globalization of jazz and offers a survey of local jazz scenes in various parts of the planet. Rather than presenting jazz as an exclusive U.S. tradition spreading throughout the world, the course fosters an understanding of jazz as taking shape in a series of diasporic channels, defined by the constant flux of musicians, audiences, and mass mediated music as well as by its adaptation to different musical structures, social conditions, cultural meanings, and racial ideas. By studying how musicians in multiple locals around the planet have engaged with jazz, the course furthers new and challenging understandings of what jazz is, of its significance in changing historical and cultural scenarios, and of the ways in which it has been shaped in the course of its global dissemination.    
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AMST 3330 : Ways of Knowing: Indigenous and Place-Based Ecological Knowledge
Crosslisted as: AIIS 3330, NTRES 3330, NTRES 6330 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Karim-Aly Kassam
Based on indigenous and place-based "ways of knowing," this course (1) presents a theoretical and humanistic framework from which to understand generation of ecological knowledge; (2) examines processes by which to engage indigenous and place-based knowledge of natural resources, the nonhuman environment, and human-environment interactions; and (3) reflects upon the relevance of this knowledge to climatic change, resource extraction, food sovereignty, medicinal plant biodiversity, and issues of sustainability and conservation.  The fundamental premise of this course is that human beings are embedded in their ecological systems.
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AMST 3370 : Contemporary American Theatre on Stage and Screen
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3370, PMA 3758 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
J Gainor
How has theatre shaped our notion of America and Americans in the second half of the 20th century and beyond? What role has politics played in recent theatrical experimentation? How has performance been used as a platform for constructing and deconstructing concepts of identity, community, and nationality? And how and why have certain plays in this era been translated to the screen? In this course we will examine major trends in the American theatre from 1960 to the present. We will focus on theatre that responds directly to or intervenes in moments of social turmoil, including: the Vietnam and Iraq Wars, the Civil Rights Movement, the Women's Movement, and the AIDS epidemic. We will also explore the tensions between Broadway and alternative theatre production.
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AMST 3380 : Urban Inequality
Crosslisted as: SOC 3380 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kendra Bischoff
This is a seminar course on urban inequality in the United States.  The first half of the semester will be dedicated to understanding the political, historical, and social determinants of inequality in America's cities. Politically and socially, cities face unique challenges. Municipalities lack much formal authority to resolve issues that arise within their borders, and their populations are highly heterogeneous in terms of ethnicity, race, and social class. In the second half of the course, we will investigate a number of contemporary facets of urban inequality in-depth, such as residential segregation, urban schooling, immigration, and suburban sprawl.
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AMST 3405 : Multicultural Issues in Education
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3405, EDUC 3405, LSP 3405 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sofia Villenas
This course explores research on race, ethnicity and language in American education. It examines historical and current patterns of school achievement for minoritized youths. It also examines the cultural and social premises undergirding educational practices in diverse communities and schools. Policies, programs and pedagogy, including multicultural and bilingual education, are explored.
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AMST 3420 : Refugees and the Politics of Vulnerability: Intersections of Feminist Theory and Practice
Crosslisted as: FGSS 3400, GOVT 3401, LSP 3402 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jane Juffer
Topic Spring 2019: Child Refugees and Politics: Children comprised 52 percent of the worldwide refugee population of 68.5 million in 2017. Traveling with families as well as unaccompanied, they appear in media accounts as the most vulnerable and at risk of all refugees. In this course, we will consider to what degree this assignation of vulnerability, often corresponding with victimhood, shapes the journeys and lives of refugee children. We will use the growing body of feminist scholarship on vulnerability in law, philosophy, migration studies, and other fields to investigate how "vulnerability" creates categories of worthy and unworthy victims. In the U.S., for example, images of babies and toddlers being separated from Central American parents prompted outrage. Yet images of teenage boys in makeshift tents in the New Mexico desert went largely uncovered. At what age does a child no longer deserve sympathy and protection? In what ways does vulnerability overshadow children's agency? How might vulnerability be rearticulated so as to address children's specific needs, at different ages? Our main focus will be Central American and Mexican children crossing into the U.S. at the southern border, but we will make comparisons to other groups throughout the world.
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AMST 3430 : History of the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction
Crosslisted as: HIST 3430 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Edward Baptist
A survey of the turning point of US. history: The Civil War (1861-1865) and its aftermath, Reconstruction (1865-1877). We will look at the causes, the coming, and the conduct, of the war, and the way in which it became a war for freedom. We will then follow the cause of freedom through the greatest slave rebellion in American history, and the attempts by formerly enslaved people to make freedom real in Reconstruction. And we will see how Reconstruction's tragic ending left questions open that are still not answered in U.S. society and politics.
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AMST 3506 : Slavery and Visual Culture
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3506, ASRC 3506, COML 3681, VISST 3506 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cheryl Finley
This interdisciplinary undergraduate lecture examines the visual culture of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade from the 16th century to the present. Lectures present artifacts, prints, paintings, photographs, sculpture, film and installation art that images the history of slavery and its profound contemporary resonance. Lectures and assignments consider the following themes: how does the gaze structure vision and influence the control of historical narratives? Which themes dominate the visual culture of slavery? How does visual culture encode memory, violence or racism? How did the visual culture of slavery produce and circulate new technologies of vison? Where is the history of slavery visible in the built environment or the local landscape? Students study artifacts in the May Anti-Slavery Collection at Kroch Library and artworks at the Johnson Museum. Field trip to nearby anti-slavery sites of memory.
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AMST 3525 : Howls and Love Songs: Twentieth Century American Poetry
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3525 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Roger Gilbert
Twentieth-century poetry has been closely identified with what Ezra Pound famously termed the challenge to "Make It New." Yet the question of just what "making it new" might mean was hotly contested throughout the century. Why did poets feel the need to make it new? What did making it new mean to people entering the institution of "poetry" from different social positions? American poetry diversified as it also rose in international influence. We will look at a number of different forms of poetry developed by poets from the United States, not forgetting to note the extent to which "Americanism" was or was not of concern to them in their experiments.
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AMST 3533 : Screen and Story: Script Analysis
Crosslisted as: PMA 3533 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Austin Bunn
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AMST 3560 : Modeling Race, Fashioning Beauty
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3550, FGSS 3540 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Noliwe Rooks
This course explores written and visual biographies of African American and African women in the fashion industry as a launching point for thinking about beauty, race, gender and class. Some of the questions that will be explored during the semester are: How do ethnicity and femininity intersect? How are authenticity and difference commodified? How do women construct identities through narrative or craft themselves through body modification? How do women negotiate their relationships to their bodies, families and nations? Contemporary television programs, global fashion and cultural studies will also be discussed. Students will write self-narratives about their relationships with cultural standards of beauty.
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AMST 3581 : Imagining Migration in Film and Literature
Crosslisted as: COML 3580, GERST 3581, PMA 3481, VISST 3581 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Leslie Adelson
Sabine Haenni
What role should imaginative arts play in debates about transnational migration, one of the principal factors re-shaping community and communication today?  Focusing on literature and film from the late 20th and early 21st centuries, with primary examples drawn from Germany, France and the United States—in relation to Turkey, Hungary, Tunisia, Iran, Nigeria, China, Mexico, and Japan—this course explores how creative arts rework the fabric of social life affected by migration.  Seminar-style discussion of assigned readings and viewings, with occasional lectures on other arts and regions.  Thematic units organized around key concepts such as borders and movement, ethnoscapes and citizenship, reading and viewing, labor and leisure, cityscapes and place-making, mediascapes and personhood, lawfulness and illegality, language and speech, art and perception.   
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AMST 3703 : Asians in the Americas: A Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: AAS 3030, ANTHR 3703, ANTHR 6703 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Viranjini Munasinghe
The common perception of ethnicity is that it is a "natural" and an inevitable consequence of cultural difference. "Asians" overseas, in particular, have won repute as a people who cling tenaciously to their culture and refuse to assimilate into their host societies and cultures. But, who are the "Asians?" On what basis can we label "Asians" an ethnic group? Although there is a significant Asian presence in the Caribbean, the category "Asian" itself does not exist in the Caribbean. What does this say about the nature of categories that label and demarcate groups of people on the basis of alleged cultural and phenotypical characteristics? This course will examine the dynamics behind group identity, namely ethnicity, by comparing and contrasting the multicultural experience of Asian populations in the Caribbean and the United States. Ethnographic case studies will focus on the East Indian and Chinese experiences in the Caribbean and the Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Filipino, and Indian experiences in the United States.
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AMST 3717 : Sitcom Jews: Ethnic Representation On Television and On Stage
Crosslisted as: JWST 3711, PMA 3711 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
David Winitsky
"Sitcom Jews" uses close media analysis, theoretical discussion, and student performances or media projects to examine the representation of Jews on television and on the Broadway stage from 1948-2017. We'll ask whether study of performed Jewish identity can serve as a locus for discussion of cultural representation at large, including African American, Latinx, Asian American and LGBT communities on screen and onstage. Starting with classic sitcoms ("The Goldbergs" (1948), "All in the Family", and "Bridget Loves Bernie"), and continuing through current Jewish TV shows ("The Marvelous Ms. Maisel", "Transparent", "Curb Your Enthusiasm"), as well as major theater landmarks ("Fiddler on the Roof", "Cabaret", "Bad Jews", "Indecent"), we will compare these constructed media images to concurrent political, historical and cultural trends.
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AMST 3719 : The Jewish Life of DNA
Crosslisted as: JWST 3719, RELST 3719, STS 3719 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cara Rock-Singer
This course will explore the relationship between DNA and Jewish life. We will conceive of Jews and Judaism broadly, in terms of religious, ethnic, and national discourses as we consider theories of kinship and nationalism, definitions of ethnicity and race, the "molecularization" of human life, the use of DNA as a spiritual metaphor, the ethics of "playing God" through biomedicine, and imaginations of utopian and dystopian futures. The entangled social, political, economic, legal, metaphorical, and theological questions that DNA has raised during the twentieth century will serve as a lens to fundamental issues in Jewish Studies and Science and Technology Studies about the nature of Jewish identity and about the social and political elements of knowledge production, respectively. Our readings will combine scholarly texts with a range of primary sources, while our classroom discussions will include guest lectures by scholars from Molecular Biology and other relevant fields to discuss the religious and social implications of their research. 
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AMST 3732 : Africans and African Americans in Literature
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3742, ENGL 3742 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Mukoma Ngugi
When an African and an African American meet, solidarity is presumed, but often friction is the result. In this course, we will consider how Africans and African Americans see each other through literature. What happens when two peoples suffering from double consciousness meet? We will examine the influence of historical forces including slavery, colonialism and pan-Africanism on the way writers explore the meeting between Africans and African Americans. Specifically we will look at how writers such as W.E.B DuBois, Maya Angelou, NoViolet Bulawayo, Chimamanda Adichie, Richard Wright, Eugene Robinson, Philippe Wamba, Teju Cole, and Malcolm X have understood the meeting.
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AMST 3754 : Spoken Word, Hip-Hop Theater, and the Politics of the Performance
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3954, FGSS 3754, LGBT 3754, LSP 3754, PMA 3754 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Karen Jaime
In this course, we will critically examine the production and performance of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender through literature and contemporary performance genres such as spoken word, slam poetry, and hip-hop theatre.
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AMST 3810 : American Architecture and Building I
Crosslisted as: ARCH 3810, ARCH 5810 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Mary Woods
Review of architecture, building, and responses to the landscape from the prehistoric period to the Civil War. Architecture and building as social and collaborative arts are emphasized and thus the contributions of artisans, clients, and users as well as professional architects and builders are examined. The architectural expressions of Native Americans, African Americans, women, and others are treated in addition to those of European colonists and settlers.
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AMST 3820 : Poetry and Poetics of the Americas
Crosslisted as: COML 3800, ENGL 3910, LATA 3800, SPAN 3800 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Jonathan Monroe
As globalization draws the Americas ever closer together, reshaping our sense of a common and uncommon American culture, what claims might be made for a distinctive, diverse poetry and poetics of the America? How might we characterize its dominant forms and alternative practices? What shared influences, affiliations, concerns and approaches might we find and what differences emerge? Ranging across North and South America, Central America and the Caribbean, this course will place in conversation such figures as Poe, Stein, Eliot, Pound, Williams, Neruda, Vallejo, Borges, Parra, Césaire, Walcott, Bolaño, Espada, Waldrop, Vicuña, Hong, and Rankine.
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AMST 3854 : Special Topics in Regional Development and Globalization
Crosslisted as: CRP 3854, GOVT 3494 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
This course addresses pertinent issues relative to the subject of regional development and globalization. Topics vary each semester.
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AMST 3870 : The History of Consumption: From Wedgwood to Wal-Mart
Crosslisted as: HIST 3870, ILRLR 3870 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Louis Hyman
Whether buying at a general store, shopping at a department store, or loitering at a mall, consumption has always formed an important part of the American experience. More than just commodities bought and sold, consumption is also about the institutions, social practices, cultural meanings, and economic functions that have surrounded the merchandise. This course will look at the changing meanings consumption has had for life, politics, and economy in the US over the past 300 years.
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AMST 3911 : Science in the American Polity, 1960 to Now
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3091, STS 3911 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Stephen Hilgartner
This course reviews the changing political relations between science, technology, and the state in America from 1960 to the present. It focuses on policy choices involving science and technology in different institutional settings, such as Congress, the court system, and regulatory agencies. The tension between the concepts of science as an autonomous republic and as just another interest group is a central theme.
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AMST 3980 : Independent Research
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Affords opportunities for students to carry out independent research under appropriate supervision. Each student is expected to review pertinent literature, prepare a project outline, conduct the research, and prepare a report. Topic and credit hours TBD as arranged between faculty and student.
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AMST 3980 : Independent Research
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Affords opportunities for students to carry out independent research under appropriate supervision. Each student is expected to review pertinent literature, prepare a project outline, conduct the research, and prepare a report. Topic and credit hours TBD as arranged between faculty and student.
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AMST 3981 : Latinx Popular Culture Matters
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3980, LSP 3980 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ella Diaz
This course analyzes several areas of Latinx popular culture that deeply impacted U.S. politics and history, artistic productions, and aesthetic sensibilities, as well as popular and civic cultures. Mapping a historical trajectory of Chicanidad and Latinidad in art, music, film, and popular media in the twentieth century, the course also engages contemporary practices in art that are rooted in 1960s and 1970s civil rights and community art movements. Topics include Latinx people in film and TV, muralism and street art, music, spoken word as well as close examinations of representations of Latinx people in American mainstream culture.
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AMST 3990 : Readings in American Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Individualized readings for junior and senior students. Topics, requirements, and credit hours will be determined in consultation between the student and the supervising faculty member.
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AMST 3990 : Readings in American Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Individualized readings for junior and senior students. Topics, requirements, and credit hours will be determined in consultation between the student and the supervising faculty member.
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AMST 4021 : American Conservative Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4021 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Richard Bensel
American conservative thought rests on assumptions that are strikingly different from those made by mainstream American liberals.  However, conservative thinkers are themselves committed to principles that are both quite varied and sometimes contradictory.  This course examines the assumptions upon which rest the libertarian, market/economic, and cultural/traditional strains of American conservatism and asks whether the tensions between them weaken or strengthen conservative thought as an alternative to mainstream liberalism.
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AMST 4021 : American Conservative Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4021 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Richard Bensel
American conservative thought rests on assumptions that are strikingly different from those made by mainstream American liberals.  However, conservative thinkers are themselves committed to principles that are both quite varied and sometimes contradictory.  This course examines the assumptions upon which rest the libertarian, market/economic, and cultural/traditional strains of American conservatism and asks whether the tensions between them weaken or strengthen conservative thought as an alternative to mainstream liberalism.
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AMST 4030 : Poetry in Process
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4030 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Roger Gilbert
A close study of three major 20th century poets (Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks) who attended scrupulously to the diversity of life, both social and biological, while expanding the form and language of poetry. As women poets writing in a period dominated by males, they established a space for poetry that seems disarmingly modest in its emphasis on nature and domesticity yet harbors enormous moral power and sharp social critique. As an African American, Brooks made racial inequity a central focus of her work, but all three poets forcefully address issues of identity and injustice. We will read each poet's work in its entirety, tracking their careers from early to middle to late periods while putting them in ongoing dialogue with one another.
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AMST 4039 : Reconstruction and the New South
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4390, ASRC 6391, HIST 4390, HIST 6391 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Margaret Washington
This course focuses on the American South in the nineteenth century as it made the transition from Reconstruction to new forms of social organization and patterns of race relations. Reconstruction will be considered from a sociopolitical perspective, concentrating on the experiences of the freed people. The New South emphasis will include topics on labor relations, economic and political changes, new cultural alliances, the rise of agrarianism, and legalization of Jim Crow.
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AMST 4051 : Death Penalty in America
Crosslisted as: LAW 4051 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
John Blume
Sheri Johnson
The death penalty has gotten increased media attention due to high profile death row exonerations, and has long been under siege for other reasons, such as racial disparities in its imposition and the prevalence of very poor representation by defense counsel. This course surveys the legal and social issues that arise in the administration of the death penalty. The reading will be largely comprised of reported death penalty cases, but will be augmented by a variety of other sources, including empirical studies of the death penalty and the litigation experience of the professors. Although the focus will be on capital punishment as practiced in the United States, we will also consider international and comparative perspectives. Guest speakers will provide a range of views, and law students with experience working on capital cases will lead discussion sections.
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AMST 4052 : Critical Filipino/Filipino American Studies
Crosslisted as: AAS 4050, ASIAN 4452 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christine Balance
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AMST 4130 : Service Learning for Democratic Citizenship: Literature of American Social Action Movements
Crosslisted as: WRIT 4130 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Darlene Evans
To what extent is civic engagement fundamental to democratic citizenship? This course seeks to answer that question by exploring the components of service learning as a discipline and to strengthen the intellectual foundation of students who wish to incorporate civic engagement into their curriculum. Students will become familiar with the history of service learning, explore competing theories of social justice and social inequality, and develop a framework for social action that exists at the juncture of theory and practice. Readings will include texts by Dewey, Freire, bell hooks, Franklin, Jefferson, Thoreau, Addams, Baldwin, King, Dorothy Day, and Fanon. Weekly seminar papers as well as a term paper through which students develop their own philosophy of civic engagement.
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AMST 4194 : American Shakespeare
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4291, PMA 4190 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
AMST 4220 : Locke and the Philosophies of Dispossession: Indigenous America's Interruptions and Resistances
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4200, AIIS 6200, AMST 6220, PHIL 4941, PHIL 6941 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Troy Richardson
This course looks at the philosopher John Locke as a philosopher of dispossession. There is a uniquely Lockean mode of missionization, conception of mind and re-formulations of the 'soul' applied to dispossess Indigenous peoples of the social institutions, intellectual traditions and the material bases and practices which sustain(ed) them. While colonization is typically used as a kind of shorthand for this process, we will be attempting to stay focused on the specific dimensions of Lockean dispossession and its mutually informing relationship with English colonialism.
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AMST 4283 : Latino Politics as Racial Politics
Crosslisted as: GOVT 4283, LSP 4283 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Sergio Garcia-Rios
This class will examine the history and contemporary role of Latinos as a minority group in the U.S. political system. This course is intended as an overview of the political position of Latinos y Latinas in the United States. We place special emphasis on how Latinos became racial group which allows us to focus on political relationships between Latinos and non-Latinos as they relate to political institutions, political parties, voting coalitions, representation and public policy.
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AMST 4295 : US Borders North & South
Crosslisted as: AMST 6295, HIST 4295, HIST 6295, LSP 4295, LSP 6295 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Maria Cristina Garcia
Jon Parmenter
The borders that separate the United States from Canada and Mexico are among the longest in the world. The southern border with Mexico, however, receives a disproportionate amount of attention from policymakers, journalists, and artists, while our northern border is largely unfamiliar to most Americans.  This upper-level seminar offers a necessary corrective:  a comparative examination of the political, economic, and cultural history of these two North American borderlands. The US-Mexico and US-Canada border zones are sites of conflict and negotiation, nationalism and globalization, sovereignty and multiculturalism.  The seminar examines the continuities and discontinuities in the history and evolution of America's territorial borders from the colonial era to the present.
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AMST 4470 : Data Bodies: Latinx Art and Politics
Crosslisted as: LSP 4470, STS 4470 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ivan Chaar Lopez
What shapes do data and bodies take in digital environments? Conversely, how have computing cultures and networks been shaped by data and bodies? What kinds of politics can be performed in such conditions? This course tackles these questions by centering the artistic practices of Latinxs and their contributions to the history of performance, multimedia art and tactical media.
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AMST 4519 : Toni Morrison's Novels
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4509, ASRC 6513, ENGL 4509, ENGL 6513, FGSS 4509, FGSS 6513 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Riche Richardson
Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison received her M.A. in English at Cornell University in 1955.  To study her, in a way, is to gain a deeper understanding of how she journeyed on from her days as a student here to become one of the world's greatest writers, how she has helped to transform world literature, and  how she has  shaped  Cornell's great legacy.  In this course, we will engage in close and reflective critical readings of Toni Morrison's eleven novels.  Morrison's writing style is characterized by highly distinctive strategies in the development of narrative and in the use of language.  Furthermore, from novel to novel, she is even known for developing features such as the very first sentence with great contemplation, an approach that also demonstrates her commitment to form.  As we journey across her body of work as readers, we will examine a range of recurring themes, along with the "love trilogy" on which she focused her repertoire for several years.  The course, through a comprehensive, chronological and focused look at Morrison's body of novels, will help students who entirely lack familiarity with it to gain a strong foundation for further research and study.  By the end of the course, even students who already know Morrison's work will walk away with a deeper and more nuanced critical understanding of it.  The course will help students to reinforce their skills in reading fiction, and help them to become more astute and exacting readers of the novel as a genre.  Morrison's novels have placed her at the vanguard of the globalization of the novel itself, and she is, undisputedly, one the most famous and innovative writers in the world.  She emerged as one of the greatest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century, and her audiences have continued to be captivated by her literary genius in this millennial age.  She is one of the most revered writers within the American literary establishment and has helped to reshape it both as a critic and novelist.  Her work can help one to develop more mastery in reading the novel as a genre.  Indeed, her thinking about this area is so original and pivotal that her fiction and critical works are absolutely indispensable for all serious students and scholars in fields such as American literature.  Its impact on African American literature is equally vital.  We will focus on reading the repertoire of novels by Morrison, including The Bluest Eye, Sula (1973), Song of Solomon (1977), Tar Baby (1981), Beloved (1987), Jazz (1992), Paradise (1998), Love (2003),  A Mercy (2008) Home (2012), and God Bless the Child (2014).  We will screen the 1998 film adaptation of her novel Beloved, along with documentaries related to Morrison such as Gail Pellet and Bill Moyers's Toni Morrison:  A Writer's Work and Gary Deans, Alan Hall and Jana Wendt's Toni Morrison: Uncensored.
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AMST 4525 : Twentieth-Century Women Writers and Artists
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4525 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Shirley Samuels
Description
AMST 4533 : The Lower East Side: Jews and the Immigrant City
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4733, ILRLR 4533, ILRLR 7533, JWST 4533, JWST 7533, NES 4533, NES 7533 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Elissa Sampson
American Jews have frequently been touted as a "model minority." This course will take a more critical look at the historical interactions between Jewish immigration, United States industrialization, and processes of social and geographical mobility—all through the prism of New York's Lower East Side, first home for over 750,000 Jewish immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe, the Ottoman Empire and elsewhere between the mid-19th century and the 1920s.  We will compare the Jewish experience to that of other immigrants/migrants by considering social institutions as well as material and other cultural practices. We will examine interactions with the built environment —most especially the tenement—in Lower East Side culture. Special attention will be paid to immigrant labor movement politics including strikes, splits, and gender in the garment trade. From the perspective of the present, the course will examine how commemoration, heritage tourism and the selling of [immigrant] history intersect with gentrifying real estate in an "iconic" New York City neighborhood. Projects using the ILR's archives on the Triangle Fire and other topics are explicitly encouraged. This course counts as an out of college elective for B. Arch and M. Arch students.
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AMST 4550 : Race and the University
Crosslisted as: AAS 4550, ENGL 4961, HIST 4551 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Derek Chang
Sunn Wong
What is a university, what does it do, and how does it do it? Moving out from these more general questions, this seminar will focus on a more specific set of questions concerning the place of race within the university. What kinds of knowledge are produced in the 20th- century U.S. university? Why is it, and how is it, that certain knowledge formations and disciplines come to be naturalized or privileged within the academy? How has the emergence of fields of inquiry such as Ethnic Studies (with an epistemological platform built on the articulations of race, class and gender) brought to the fore (if not brought to crisis) some of the more vexing questions that strike at the core of the idea of the university as the pre-eminent site of disinterested knowledge? This seminar will give students the opportunity to examine American higher education's (particularly its major research institutions) historical instantiation of the relations amongst knowledge, power, equality and democracy.
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AMST 4630 : Pluralism and Political Authority
Crosslisted as: AMST 6630, GOVT 4835, GOVT 6835, PHIL 4435, PHIL 6435, SHUM 4631, SHUM 6631 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Avigail Eisenberg
This seminar considers new directions in thinking about political authority that focus on the claims of non-state groups. It considers leading 20th century political theorists who have recognized authority to be plural and contested as well as those who have resisted this characterization. We explore contemporary scholarship about religious groups that claim authority over their members, Indigenous peoples that claim authority over lands and resources, and employers that claim authority over workers by imposing their own rules and norms even if these depart from ones endorsed by the state. The aim is to understand where legitimate authority comes from, how it is enacted, and what role (if any) it plays in shaping the identities of those who are subject to it.  
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AMST 4640 : Racial Ecologies of Transpacific Nuclearism
Crosslisted as: AAS 4640, COML 4640, FGSS 4641, FGSS 6641, SHUM 4640, SHUM 6640 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
This course examines the emergence of nuclear energy in Asia and the Pacific after World War Two as a transpacific settler colonial institution and discourse. Building on current environmental humanities scholarship on the nuclear Pacific, this course uses transpacific nuclearism as an anchoring point to explore ways that theories of biopolitics, necropolitics, and comparative racialization can productively inform scholarly approaches to contemporary ecological crises. For longer description and instructor bio visit http://societyhumanities.as.cornell.edu/courses.
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AMST 4655 : Topics in Social and Political Philosophy
Crosslisted as: AMST 6656, GOVT 4655, GOVT 6656, PHIL 4470, PHIL 6430, SOC 4430, SOC 6430 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Richard Miller
Advanced discussion of topics in social and political philosophy.
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AMST 4671 : How the Civil War Haunts America
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4671 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Shirley Samuels
The Civil War haunts the United States. Its legacy still drives protests over confederate monuments. Nineteenth-century writers and artists confronted war in their own backyards. Taking advantage of our location in Washington, we will consider how present day memorials and re-enactments keep the war alive, as well as reading 19th century poetry and novels. Looking at photographs and political cartoons gives a visual resonance to the iconography of national violence. We will visit archives at the Library of Congress, the National Museum of the American Indian, and the National Museum of African American History. And we will read newspaper coverage from the 2018-2019 debates over monuments. This class satisfies the pre-1900 requirement in American Studies as well as the capstone seminar requirement.
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AMST 4733 : The Future of Whiteness
Crosslisted as: AMST 6733, ASRC 4733, ENGL 4733, ENGL 6733 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Satya Mohanty
How should anti-racist people respond to the new racialized white identities that have emerged recently in Europe and the United States?  What alternative conceptions of whiteness are available? How can we form cross-racial progressive coalitions? How should we understand the nature of our social identities and what they make possible?  This course is a wide-ranging introduction to these questions with readings drawn from social and cultural theory, as well as literature and film. Films include Get Out and I Am Not Your Negro, as well as such Hollywood classics as Imitation of Life. Texts by such writers as James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Danzy Senna and Dorothy Allison, as well as relevant anthropological and social-theoretical work (Strangers in Their Own Land, Whiteness of a Different Color) and memoirs of anti-racist activists.  A central text will be the recent book The Future of Whiteness by the Latina feminist scholar Linda Martin Alcoff.
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AMST 4851 : Refugees
Crosslisted as: HIST 4851, HIST 6851, LSP 4851, LSP 6851 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Maria Cristina Garcia
Since World War II, over 4 million people have migrated to the United States as refugees. In this seminar we will examine some of these refugee migrations and the ways these migrations challenged our understanding of the United States as a "haven for the oppressed." We will examine the crafting of refugee/asylum policy, the role of nongovernmental actors in influencing policy, and the ways policy reflected foreign-policy interests and security concerns. The last weeks of the course will pay particular attention to climate refugees and asylum-seekers, and our changing definitions of who 'merits' protection in the United States.
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AMST 4944 : Biopolitics: New Directions
Crosslisted as: COML 4944, COML 6944, FGSS 4944, GOVT 6946, ROMS 4944, ROMS 6944 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Naminata Diabate
Description
AMST 4993 : Honors Essay Tutorial I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, AMST majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an AMST faculty member and defend that thesis orally before a committee. Students interested in the honors program should consult the AMST director during the junior year and submit an honors application by May 1 of the junior year.
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AMST 4994 : Honors Essay Tutorial II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
To graduate with honors, AMST majors must complete a senior thesis under the supervision of an AMST faculty member and defend that thesis orally before a committee. Students interested in the honors program should consult the AMST director during the junior year and submit an honors application by May 1 of the junior year.
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AMST 6015 : Photography and the Archive
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4015, ARTH 6015 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Cheryl Finley
This graduate seminar explores the making of photographic archives, the narratives they tell, and the parameters that define them as objects of study. As visual collections, photographic archives present specific concerns - especially as digital technologies change the way knowledge is classified, stored, retrieved and disseminated. To be sure, differential power relations determine what is collected - what is remembered or forgotten - by societies and institutions. Social and economic histories as well as experiences of race, class, gender and sexuality affect the construction, acquisition and maintenance of archives and their ability to influence knowledge production. Students in this course study archival practices by choosing a unique photographic archive at Cornell for a research project, which may be realized as an exhibition (online or otherwise), a documentary film, or a digital humanities project.
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AMST 6201 : The United States Congress
Crosslisted as: GOVT 6201 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Bateman
The United States Congress will be examined: first, as a "closed system" in which institutional arrangements decisively apportion political power; and, second, as the product of electoral and social forces outside the institution. Emphasis will be placed on the historical relationship between institutional growth and state formation, parliamentary rules as both arrangements within which the "rational choices" of legislators are played out and as deliberate, constructions and allocations of political influence, and the use of legislative behavior as evidence in the analysis of fundamental principles of politics. Because the literature on the lower chamber is generally more rich, the House of Representatives will receive greater attention than the Senate.
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AMST 6202 : Political Culture
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6102, GOVT 6202, HIST 6202, SOC 6200 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Richard Bensel
This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.
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AMST 6220 : Locke and the Philosophies of Dispossession: Indigenous America's Interruptions and Resistances
Crosslisted as: AIIS 4200, AIIS 6200, AMST 4220, PHIL 4941, PHIL 6941 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Troy Richardson
This course looks at the philosopher John Locke as a philosopher of dispossession. There is a uniquely Lockean mode of missionization, conception of mind and re-formulations of the 'soul' applied to dispossess Indigenous peoples of the social institutions, intellectual traditions and the material bases and practices which sustain(ed) them. While colonization is typically used as a kind of shorthand for this process, we will be attempting to stay focused on the specific dimensions of Lockean dispossession and its mutually informing relationship with English colonialism.
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AMST 6295 : US Borders North & South
Crosslisted as: AMST 4295, HIST 4295, HIST 6295, LSP 4295, LSP 6295 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Maria Cristina Garcia
Jon Parmenter
The borders that separate the United States from Canada and Mexico are among the longest in the world. The southern border with Mexico, however, receives a disproportionate amount of attention from policymakers, journalists, and artists, while our northern border is largely unfamiliar to most Americans.  This upper-level seminar offers a necessary corrective:  a comparative examination of the political, economic, and cultural history of these two North American borderlands. The US-Mexico and US-Canada border zones are sites of conflict and negotiation, nationalism and globalization, sovereignty and multiculturalism.  The seminar examines the continuities and discontinuities in the history and evolution of America's territorial borders from the colonial era to the present.
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AMST 6321 : Black Power Movement and Transnationalism
Crosslisted as: ASRC 6321, HIST 6321 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Russell Rickford
This seminar explores the international and transnational dimensions of the Black Power Movement, broadly defined. Beginning with an examination of transnationalism in the early 20th century, it examines the thought and political activities of African-American intellectuals and activists who crossed national boundaries, figuratively and literally, in the quest for black freedom. We will focus on the postwar era, particularly the 1950s through the 1980s, exploring transnationalism in the context of black feminism, Marxism, black nationalism, Pan Africanism, and other political traditions. We will examine the meeting and mingling of transnational discourses, ideologies, and activists in North America, the Caribbean, and Africa. 
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AMST 6630 : Pluralism and Political Authority
Crosslisted as: AMST 4630, GOVT 4835, GOVT 6835, PHIL 4435, PHIL 6435, SHUM 4631, SHUM 6631 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Avigail Eisenberg
This seminar considers new directions in thinking about political authority that focus on the claims of non-state groups. It considers leading 20th century political theorists who have recognized authority to be plural and contested as well as those who have resisted this characterization. We explore contemporary scholarship about religious groups that claim authority over their members, Indigenous peoples that claim authority over lands and resources, and employers that claim authority over workers by imposing their own rules and norms even if these depart from ones endorsed by the state. The aim is to understand where legitimate authority comes from, how it is enacted, and what role (if any) it plays in shaping the identities of those who are subject to it.
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AMST 6631 : American Poetry: 1950-2000
Crosslisted as: ENGL 6631 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Roger Gilbert
Description
AMST 6656 : Topics in Social and Political Philosophy
Crosslisted as: AMST 4655, GOVT 4655, GOVT 6656, PHIL 4470, PHIL 6430, SOC 4430, SOC 6430 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Richard Miller
Advanced discussion of a topic in social and political philosophy.
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AMST 6733 : The Future of Whiteness
Crosslisted as: AMST 4733, ASRC 4733, ENGL 4733, ENGL 6733 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Satya Mohanty
How should anti-racist people respond to the new racialized white identities that have emerged recently in Europe and the United States?  What alternative conceptions of whiteness are available? How can we form cross-racial progressive coalitions? How should we understand the nature of our social identities and what they make possible?  This course is a wide-ranging introduction to these questions with readings drawn from social and cultural theory, as well as literature and film. Films include Get Out and I Am Not Your Negro, as well as such Hollywood classics as Imitation of Life. Texts by such writers as James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Danzy Senna and Dorothy Allison, as well as relevant anthropological and social-theoretical work (Strangers in Their Own Land, Whiteness of a Different Color) and memoirs of anti-racist activists.  A central text will be the recent book The Future of Whiteness by the Latina feminist scholar Linda Martin Alcoff.
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AMST 6818 : Race, Performance, and Sound Studies
Crosslisted as: AAS 6818, PMA 6818 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Christine Balance
This course engages with new and foundational writings in sound studies that center the racialized body -- be it of the performer, listener, or critic -- as well as racialized histories, places, and practices. This interdisciplinary course will study methodological tools, critical concepts, and readings drawn from queer, feminist, black, Latinx, Asian American, and postcolonial approaches, to name a few. We will engage with the role of sound and its technologies throughout U.S. history (i.e. slavery, wars and empire, social movements, immigration & migration, militarism) as well as the ways in which racialized performers, listeners, and critics have labored within and against these sonic regimes, imagining new politics, practices, and ways of being.
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